Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

PET PAIN GO AWAY

Just as there are many types of pain there are many ways to treat pain in both pets and people. Pets can become painful for numerous reasons. Dogs and cats experience bone pain, joint pain, ligament pain, tendon pain, skeletal muscle pain, neurologic pain and internal organ pain. Depending on the type of pain your pet is experiencing there specific therapies will help relieve the pain.

Probably the most common type of pain pets experience is musculoskeletal pain. Osteoarthritis is the most well known cause of pain in older animals. Arthritis can be seen in both young and old pets but by far osteoarthritis is the most common type of old age disease that veterinarians treat on a daily basis. Traditional veterinarians treat arthritis with non steroidal anti inflammatories and narcotic pain killers. And although these remedies often work quite well to relieve pain and inflammation when used long term they can not only damage the pet’s joints but also cause liver, kidney and gastro-intestinal damage. That is why holistic veterinarians prefer to use therapies that not only relieve pain but also help repair damage tissue. Acupuncture, chiropractic, micro-current therapy, infra-sonic therapy, pulsed magnetic therapy, cytokine therapy and homotoxicology are all effective pain relievers and help repair damaged tissue. Said another way, these therapies do not just mask the pain; they also help the body repair itself.

A torn cruciate ligament in a dog’s knee is quite painful and probably the most common orthopedic injury a dog incurs. It is almost always an injury of large dogs. A common history veterinarian here is that when the owner let the dog outside he or she was walking perfectly normal but walked back in with a painful hind leg limp. Traditional veterinarians recommend that these dogs -have the leg surgically repaired. However, many holistic veterinarians know about a technique known as prolotherapy which they can use in place of conventional surgery. Prolotherapy involves a series of monthly injections of a special “sclerosing agent in and around the damaged joint. These injections create inflammation which eventually causes scar tissue to form and tighten the hyper-mobile, painful joint. Once the joint is tightened the dog can once again walk without pain. Cold laser therapy, cytokine therapy and adequin therapy can all be used along with prolotherapy in order to repair a damaged painful knee joint.

Injuries that involve a dog’s spine are extremely painful and the pet may litterly scream out in agony. Spinal cord pain may result from inter-vertebral disk degeneration or hyper-mobile vertebrae as are present in Wobblers disease. Ruptured inter-vertebral disks can be present anywhere along the spine and put pressure on the spinal cord. The muscle spasms that results from a ruptured disk putting pressure on the spinal cord are excruciatingly painful. Traditional veterinary medicine recommends the use of prednisone, muscle relaxants, narcotic analgesics and spinal cord decompression surgery. On the other hand holistic veterinarians recommend electro-acupuncture, micro-current therapy, pulsed magnetic therapy, infrasonic therapy, systemic enzymes, and cytokine therapy.

Dr. Jerry Tennant has discovered that where ever there is chronic pain there is almost always an area of low voltage or increased acidity. Consequently, in order for chronic pain to be alleviated and for healing to begin tissue voltage must initially be increased to greater than what is considered normal voltage. Once the tissue has healed the voltage decreases to normal. The additional voltage needed for healing can be obtained by reducing tissue acidity or increasing alkalinity. This can be accomplished thru adding antioxidants to the pet’s body, adding oxygen, or by using electrical magnetic devices which add electrons to the pet’s body. Such devices include the Russian Scenar, the Tennant Biomodulator, and pulsed magnetic therapy units.    To learn more about holistic methods of healing visit  www.Doc4pets.com

*******************************************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

PET MASSAGE THERAPY

Massage therapy is an invaluable tool for both the prevention and rehabilitation of musculo-skeletal and neurologic injuries in pets and humans.   It can be performed by a trained massage therapist, a veterinarian or the pet’s caregiver (after being taught  how to do it).   Massage therapy benefits the pet or human body in a number of ways including pain relief, reduction in swelling and edema of injured or overworked body parts, and the prevention or breakdown of fibrous muscular adhesions.  The term massage means “knead” and it is used to describe the manipulation of soft tissue of the body.   Massage is performed for the purpose of producing healthy changes in the musculoskeletal, nervous, respiratory, and circulatory system.    There is an increasing awareness of the physiologic, mechanical, and psychological effects of massage therapy.  Consequently, there has become a greater interest in the use of massage therapy in sport and rehabilitation medicine.    If you are considering learning to massage your own pet then there are several basic principles of massage that you should keep in mind as you apply this therapy:
1)   The pressure applied should never cause pain.   If your pet shows any discomfort reduce the pressure to where the pet is more comfortable and then slowly increase pressure to find the threshold of tolerance (i.e.  the point where pet enjoys the massage because it “hurts good”).
2)   If you are trying to sedate a painful body area then use a slow rate and constant rhythm of stroking.  If you are attempting to stimulate an area then use a fast and strong rhythm.
3)   When giving a massage you should always stroke in the direction of the blood flow.    When massaging the limbs work from area closest to the body and proceed toward the toes.
4)  The length of the massage should last only 15 minutes.   Frequent short massages seem to work better than infrequent long ones.

There are 4 basic massage techniques:
1)   Petri sage:   This technique involves compression or kneading.   Petri sage involves picking up the skin and muscle between the thumb and forefinger and the muscle is lifted from the bone or rolled and compressed.   The effect of this is to enhance circulation and get rid of waste products, stretch muscles and tendons and helps reduce or prevent adhesions.
2)  Effleurage:   This technique involves stroking, either light or heavy stroking of the skin.  This approach allows the therapist to look for areas of pain and muscle spasms.
3)   Friction:   Using the hand or fingers the skin in one area is made to move in small circles over the tissue.    It is used to loosen adhesions and encourage absorption of local edema.
4)   Percussion:  This technique uses rapid, percussive movement of both hands in alternating fashion.  The side of the hand, the fist, or the tips of the fingers is employed.

You may be interested in knowing why massage works.    Massage increases the circulation of blood and lymph.   If massage is performed in the direction of blood flow it moves blood toward the heart.  It is very effective in supporting circulation in deep veins, arterioles and capillaries.  Massage also encourages increased circulation in the superficial lymphatics and veins and aids in the exchange of blood nutrients and waste.     Massage can restore circulation to inactive muscles where blood has pooled because of poor venous return.   Massage should never be used in areas of infection or when blood clotting is suspected in order to avoid the spread of infection or the obstruction of blood flow by the plugging of blood vessels.

Moderate pressure massage causes stimulation of  special nerve endings in the  skin which can alter the of the autonomic nervous  through transmission of impulses down the Vagus nerve.  The Vagus nerve is one of the 12 cranial verves and sends and receives nerve fibers and impulses to almost every organ in the body.    Vagal nerve output effects the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and excretory system.  Essentially  massage applied to the skin and underlying connective tissue fascia will reduce sympathetic nervous system (fight and flight)  and  increase parasympathic tone.    Animals which suffer from many acute or chronic diseases have elevated sympathetic tone which can be reduced with medical massage.

The most common use of massage is the relief of tight achy muscles.    Muscle damage results in fibrosis which eventually ends up as adhesions between muscle fibers adjacent to one another.  These adhesions contract with time and produce restricted movement and shortened muscles.   Massage breaks down these adhesions and prevents future development of fibrosis and more adhesions.    Muscle injuries in athletic pets and people are most often in the deeper hard to reach muscles.  They are usually in areas where the muscle attaches to bone by structures called tendons. Massage before exercise can help prevent muscle injury and after exercise will reduce soreness, stiffness, and pain.

Massage helps reduce stress, prevents pressure sores, corrects gaits, and improves posture, and puts the body back in balance.  Once a muscle is injured the body often compensates by using other muscle.  This in turn,  can  lead to further muscle damage.
Massaging your healthy uninjured pet can be a very healthy  relaxing experience for both pet and caregiver.   Although we can’t ask our four legged friends how much they enjoy being massaged it is obvious by their demeanor that it is quite pleasurable experience.  It is also a very pleasant experience for the caregiver.   The act of massaging your pet is a great way to deepen the human animal bond you have already established.

For more information on alternative and holistic medicine please visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

HOLISTIC PAIN MANAGEMENT FOR PETS

There are many types of pain.  Some are very severe and others more tolerable.   Although we think of pain as bad it is actually the body’s way of letting us know that something is wrong.   It tells us to slow down and protect the damaged area.    Without pain we would not be aware that we were damaged in some way and we would continue doing things that would make the pain worse.    Of course, if the pain is severe using pain killers to make life more tolerable is often necessary.   However simply masking the pain without taking additional steps to help the damaged area heal would be a big mistake.

Pets can develop painful conditions for a number of reasons and what relieves their pain depends to a great extent on what causes it.    Common painful conditions that dogs and cats develop include musculo-skeletal diseases which include injured muscles, tendons, ligaments, cartilage and bone.    Specific problems such as arthritis, a torn cruciate ligament, a torn muscle, a torn menisci, hip dysplasia, a dislocated hip, osteomyelitis  and  osteosarcoma are all diseases causing musculoskeletal pain.   Other painful conditions may originate from the diseases of the nervous system including spinal cord compression from intervertebral disks disease, narrowing of the spinal canal known as vertebral stenosis. and spinal arthritis (vertebral spondylosis) which often compresses spinal nerve roots.    Gastro intestinal pain may result from gas distension, a gastric ulcer, and an intestinal foreign body causing intestinal obstruction.    Urinary tract pain can arise from stones in the kidney or passing down the ureters.   Stones lodged in the pets urethra can cause the bladder to distend and become very painful.    Oral pain can arise from loose teeth, a cavity, a tooth root abscess, or expose dental pulp.   A corneal eye ulcer, a foreign body in the eye or glaucoma can all cause severe eye pain.   To reiterate it is important to keep in mind that pain is a protective mechanism the body uses to tell the pet or person to avoid using the area while healing is occurring.  Consequently masking pain with pain killers although sometimes necessary may encourage the pet to use the limb before proper healing has occurred.

Before pain can be treated it must first be recognized by either the pet’s guardian or the veterinarian.    Because animals can’t tell us where it hurts and when it hurts caretakers and veterinarians must learn to recognize subtle signs of pain.    Sometimes pain is obvious such as when a pet walks stiffly or limps, or screams out when he or she moves in a certain way or is touched at a certain spot.   However, some dogs or cats are more stoic and pain may not be so obvious to the pet’s caretaker.    The less obvious signs of pain include a change in posture,  subtle changes in gait,  a change in ear, tail or head carriage, less activity, a decreased appetite, an increased heart rate, dilated pupils,   excessive panting, a personality change such as a more aggressive or fearful nature.

Once pain has been recognized and hopefully localized, there are many holistic options for reducing pain and making the pet more comfortable.   These options include herbal and nutritional anti-inflammatories like:     Valerian root, Rosemary, Ginger, Celery seed, Phenylalanine, DMSO, MSM, Hops, and Boswellia.  Glucosamine, collagen type 2, Hyaluranic acid, Yucca, and Ultra-InflammX .    Homotoxicology remedies like Trammel, Zeel, Spascupreel and Traumeel are all used to treat painful conditions.   The herbal or homeopathic remedy Arnica has long history of being used for pain management

Other  techniques  which can minimize pain include acupuncture, chiropractic, veterinary orthopedic manipulation (VOM), pulsed magnetic therapy,  Frequency Specific Micro current (FSM), infrasonic therapy, Class 4 Laser therapy,  massage therapy, trigger point therapy, prolo-therapy,   physical therapy,   Rubeolla viral Immune Modulator injection (RVI),  and finally Adequin and Legend injections.

The above therapies for pain can be used alone or in combination.     Keep in mind that what works well for anyone animal may not work as well for another.    Pets are like people and each individual has a unique physiology which determines which remedies or modalities work the best for them.   Consequently, it may take several trials before the best solution is found.

It is important to point out that holistic solutions are commonly not as fast acting as drugs but are much safer.     For most herbs or nutritional remedies pain relief may take as long as 2-3 weeks and consequently the quicker acting drugs may have to use in the initial stages in combination with the slower natural remedies.

Finally, one thing pet caregivers must realize is that it is very important to keep their dog under control during the healing process.    As we reduce the pets pain they want to run after birds, rabbits or squirrel in spite of their discomfort and in doing so commonly reinjure themselves.    Short easy walks can be beneficial but if the dog is pulling hard on the leash the walk may be contra-productive.

For more information on alternative and holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com.

 

****************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing
dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is
certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to  Awakenings magazine.

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Farmington, Farmington, Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, lymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe
Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint , Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

*******************************************************************************************************************************

 

 

What Is The Difference Between Holistic and Homeopathic Medicine?

Are you confused by the difference between the terms holistic medicine, homeopathic medicine , alternative medicine, complementary medicine, integrative medicine, natural medicine, vibrational medicine, energy medicine, herbal medicine,  and botanical medicine.   Well don’t feel alone, many  are .   Therefore let me attempt to help clear things up.

Holistic medicine is an umbrella term that includes such therapies as:  clinical nutrition, acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, homotoxicology, functional medicine, herbal or botanical medicine, prolo therapy,  vibrational or energy medicine, detoxification and more.  Holistic medicine views the body as a whole and not as a bunch of isolated organs or organ systems.   The holistic point of view is that no one system functions on its own .   A disease which may on the surface appear to affect only one  organ system actually affects all systems.     Holistic medicine does not attempt to name  or treat individual diseases but does attempt to identify and correct  abnormal body  functions which may underlie many diseases.     Holistic medicine believes that the major underlying causes of  dysfunction include:  malnutrition,  a leaky gut, an unbalanced immune system, an out of control inflammatory response,  poor detoxification,  a deficiency of antioxidants,  a loss of cellular communication, excessive physical and psychologic stress,   spinal misalignment,  neurotransmitter  imbalance and poor hormonal control.

Vibrational medicine, also known as energy medicine or bio resonance therapy,  is another broad category under holistic medicine.   Vibrational medicine includes soft laser therapy, homeopathy, pulsed magnetic therapy, infrasonic therapy, electro-crystal therapy, frequency specific micro current, color therapy and aroma therapy.    All of these different vibrational modalities utilize different forms of energetic vibrations to either reestablish health using resonance frequencies  or destroy  harmful bacteria or viruses using destructive frequencies.    Vibrational medicine also includes the area of hands on healing      Keep in mind that our most brilliant quantum physicist tell us that our world is not that of particles but of waves and frequencies. There is truly nothing solid about are reality.    We and our pets are in a very real sense  energy beings and given that context disease is really a body that is out of tune. Healing then is simply the retuning of the body to a state of vibrational harmony.

Alternative medicine, complimentary medicine, and integrative medicine are all terms that have all been used in place of holistic medicine.   Of these terms integrative medicine comes the closest to the description I use for holistic medicine because it implies the use of both holistic and traditional medicine together.   In its truest form holistic medicine does not exclude traditional medicine but embraces its judicious use when the situation call for it.

“Homeopathy”  is the term that is most often confused with the term  and used in place of  the term “holistic”.   New pet owners who are looking for a holistic veterinary care all too often request the homeopathic approach.   Understand that homeopathy is a specific type of holistic medicine which uses very dilute homeopathic remedies to heal patient.   On the other hand holistic medicine includes not only homeopathy but also many other holistic approaches like acupuncture and chiropractic.

For more information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets .

*****************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antibody Blood Testing Can Reduce the Dangers of Over Vaccinating

Frequently, vaccinating a dog or cat against multiple  bacterial and viral disease threats can result in a hypersensitive immune system that can lead  to allergies, auto-immune disorders, and  acute vaccine reactions.  For these reasons  it is best to vaccinate your pet against only those diseases that the animal is at high risk of being exposed to.     To further reduce the frequency of vaccination I recommend a yearly blood test that measures your pet’s antibody levels to see if they are at a  protective against Canine Distemper, Parvo, and Panleukopenia and Rhinotracheitis.    If the titers turn out to be low then vaccinating or boostering is indicated.  However, if the titer is within a protective range then no vaccine need be given .   Unfortunately, most municipalities or boarding and grooming facilites will not accept Rabies titers as proof of protection.

For more information on holistic or alternative medicine please visit our website www.do4pets.com.

**************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

The Value Of The Holistic Approach To Disease

There has been much more interest in holistic and alternative medicine in recent years.   Pet owners are becoming more sophisticated and are less likely to blindly trust drugs as the only solution to their pets problem.     Pet owners are becoming more suspicious of drugs and know that many can have serious side effects.   In addition, the failure of traditional,  drug medicine to effectively deal with chronic disease makes pet owners even more interested in looking  for and  frequently trying an alternative,  more natural approach to healing.    The failure of traditional medicine to address chronic immune mediated disease is one the main reasons pet owners are becoming disenchanted with conventional medicine.

These immune system  diseases are treated conventionally with immune suppressive drugs and antibiotics which suppress symptoms and treat secondary effects but do not address the primary cause of the problem.    Examples of such diseases are:  inflammatory bowel disease, inflammatory bladder disease in cats, and degenerative intervertebral disk disease including spondylosis.    Conventional therapy for these diseases, steroids and antibiotics, is not strongly supported by research studies and yet the traditional veterinary establishment frequently finds fault with holistic therapies  for not having the double blind studies to support its unconventional approach.      These traditional veterinarians seem to be unaware that many of their everyday conventional protocols are based only on the experience of individuals and are not  “evidence based”  which is their own established method for determining the legitimacy of treatments.

Conventional drug medicine is to be congratulated at  it’s success in treating acute disease and emergencies, however it falls very short in treating chronic disease in such a way that the patient ends up truly healthier after the treatment.     Although traditional medicine may be quite effective in suppressing the symptoms of these chronic diseases the therapy is often detrimental to the long term survival of the patient and he or she may become progressivel y weaker over time.    The conventionally prescribed drugs may often give immediate relief from chronic symptoms  but all too  often the price that is paid  is that  additional drugs are necessary  to treat the secondary symptoms and complications caused by the original therapy.   Far too often the  original cause of the problem is not addressed and, consequently,  the need for continual  drug therapy with its inherent complications is ongoing.

Yes people and their pets may be living somewhat longer than before but many are sicker than the last generation and the quality of their lives has been reduced.    The question should not be one of life span but really of “health span”.     What good is living longer if you are hurting or  sick.     The epidemic increase in auto immune and inflammatory disease is extremely troubling but conventional medicine has failed to address disease from an immunological point of view.    Consequently, traditional medicine has gone down the road of symptom suppression and not of true diseases prevention.
Holistic medicine, both human and animal,   focuses on repairing or modulating  breakdowns in the patients immune system and  bodily functions.   It looks for   genetic weaknesses,  mal nutritiion, and environmental toxicities in an attempt to fix the problem.  Killing germs with bigger and better antibiotics simply ignores the real underlying cause of the disease.   It is important to understand that infections are usually a secondary effect of immune system defects.  Dr. Louis Pasteur was the formulator of the germ theory of disease.     His position was that germs are the cause of most diseases and therefore antibiotic therapy is the solution      A contemporary of Pasteur, Dr. Claude Bernard a famous French physiologist  was of a different opinion.   He taught that the real cause of infectious disease is not germs but a defect  in patients immune system which allowed the germs to get a foot hold and mulptiply.   As the story goes, on his death bed Pasteur acknowledge that Bernard was right and agreed that it is the break down in the body’s immune defense and not the germs which  result in disease.   However, Pasteur had been the more charismatic speaker and his position  became the conventional dogma and took the medical  and veterinary profession down a road where the search for the magic bullet (antibiotics and allopathic drugs) was prime objective.    If  Dr Bernard would have been better at selling his approach the medicalthan profession would look far different  than it does today .

Holistic medicine also realizes that everything put on or in the body, whether through diet, vaccination or pesticide treatment can have a short and long term effect on the health of a sensitive individual . That’s why it’s so important to feed a healthy diet.    Hippocrates the father of medicine spoke the famous words,  “Let food be thy medicine”.    Nutritional and herbal therapy are much safer and gentler approaches to disease and , more often than not,  address the cause of the problem at a deeper level with few to no side effects.

Holistic veterinary medicine has been growing exponentially in recent years to address this growing need and demand of small animal veterinary medicine.  Membership in organizations such as The American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association, The Academy of  Veterinary Homeopathy, The American Veterinary Chiropractic Society, and The International Veterinary Acupuncture Society has taken off in this last decade. To learn more about these various modalities, including where to find a trained veterinary practitioner in these areas, and how they may be of help to especially chronically ill pets, one can start at the websites www.AHVMA.org

When seeking out a holistic veterinarian it’s important to make sure that they are adequately trained in their particular area of interest, and that they receive ongoing continuing education each year. Just as there are great variation in conventional veterinary medical skills and practice, the same can be said of holistic veterinary medical practitioners, especially as there is growing interest and an economic niche seen in this area of veterinary medicine.

For more information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com

****************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Healing Chronicly Inflammed Tissue With Oxygen Therapy

 

Regardless of  whether we are talking about pets or people,  chronic inflammatory disease   is closely  associated with  poor blood flow and  poor  oxygenation of the affected  tissue or organ.   The reduced supply of oxygen to the tissue results in a buildup of lactic acid  and a decrease in the number of  electrons available for cellular energy production and healing .   Pain and dysfunction are the end result when  reduced tissue blood flow diminishes available cellular energy necessary  for  healing inflammatory disease.

Now that we understand how  chronic inflammation is related to a decreased tissue blood supply and poor oxygenation  it only makes sense to ask how we can increase the poor blood flow to an inflammed  area .    One of the best ways is to dilate the blood vessels feeding the chronically inflammed tissue.    This can be accomplished in several   ways.   Providing your pet with supplements containing the amino acid arginine produces  vasodilatation by increasing the body’s production of nitric oxide.     A second   way  to promote vasodilatation and increased tissue oxygenation is through acupuncture.   In research studies acupuncture has been shown to stimulate nitric oxide production, dilate blood vessels, and consequently bring more oxygen and healing energy to chronically diseased tissue.      Whether we use arginine supplementation or  acupuncture  the increased tissue oxygenation will decrease unwanted acidity and increase cellular energy  both of  which will encourage damaged tissue to heal.

Regularly exercising your pets is a third way to support tissue oxygenation.      Pets that are encouraged to exercise will have better overall circulation to their tissues.    The better circulation will result in higher  levels of cellular energy and more rapid healing.    Whether you walk, jog, play fetche or Frisbee with your pet the enhanced level of activity and blood flow will definitely benefit both you and your pet.

Another way of  increasing oxygenation of your pet’s organs and tissues is by using nutritional supplements.   Dimethylgycine is a well known nutrient that is used by athletes, both human and animal, to support the immune system and increase endurance by allowing for better tissue oxygenation.     Another nutrient, Mega hydrate,  is an extremely powerful antioxidant that can helps oxygenate, hydrate, and detoxify your pets damaged cells.     Gingko Biloba is a well known herb that causes vasodilation and consequently better tissue oxygenation.   Adding Celtic sea salt to your pet’s food on a daily basis will reduce tissue acidity and help keep the body better oxygenated.    Celtic sea salt is very helpful in treating arthritis and kidney disease.   Regularly feeding your pet fresh colorful veggies will provide additional  antioxidants that will support tissue oxygenation and reduce inflammation.

Massage therapy can be a very pleasant way for you to encourage blood flow to your pet’s  sore or damaged bones, joints and muscles.   With very minimal training you can learn to massage chronicly painful areas and bring healing blood and oxygen into to the tissue.    There are also simple physical therapy techniques you can learn, such as putting damaged joints through their range of motion.   These techniques   will encourage better blood flow to an area  and increase the rate of healing.    Ozone therapy is a way of  adding oxygen to bodily tissues either by giving an ozone enema or by saturating a lactated ringers solution with ozone and then infusing the lactated ringers under the skin.   Oral hydrogen peroxide therapy is one more way of increasing oxygen in the tissues.

The above suggestions for  preventing or limiting inflammatory disease by increasing tissue oxygenation  address healing  your pet at a very fundamental level.      Treating inflammation in this way is much preferred to  using  steroids or non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs which do not heal but simply  mask symptoms of pain and dysfunction.

For more information on holistic or alternative medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com

*************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Treating Spondylosis & Disk Disease With Rubeola Viral Immunomodulator

Rubeola Virus Immunomodulator (RVI) is an extremely dilute injection of Rubeola virus.   It was originally licensed  for veterinary use to treat myositis and fibromyalgia in horses.   It has recently become available to small animal veterinarians but only with specific stipulations.   The use of RVI in small animals has been primarily for the treatment of spondylosis and intervertebral disk disease.  However Iam sure it also helps muscle inflammation as it does in horses.   Back in 1992 Dr. Don Polley wrote an article in a veterinary journal which discusses his experience using RVI on dogs.    In this article he was extremely enthusiastic about his results and it was because of this article that I became interested in the product.   When I first tried to get a bottle of RVI  I was told it was not yet available for use in Michigan but later was approved for veterinary use for dogs but only after the veterinarian got  special written permission  from the  Office of the State Veterinarian.
Spondylosis is an arthritic disease which produces “bone spurs” at the end of each vertebra.   These bone spurs continue to enlarge and will eventually bridge the intervertebral disk space and form a calcified splint across the joint.    It Is believed that the formation of these spurs , bridges and calcified splints is the body’s way of stabilizing a hyper-mobile joint that results from a disk collapse.   If these bone spurs become large enough they will impinge on the spinal nerve root and slow nerve transmission.    Bone spurs and calcified bridges can easily be seen radiographically.   Often multiple vertebral segments are involve.   Giving  a series of  RVI injections can reduce inflammation,  restore the nerve transmission and strengthen the gait.     The injections are given just under the skin and not in the muscle so they are not uncomfortable.     Response to these injection is often  rapid and within 1 week to 10 days we will usually be able to determine if therapy was successful.     Success is based on the disappearance of such symptoms as hind leg weakness,  knuckling over and dragging the toes, and a drunken appearance to the gait.   RVI injections  are quite safe and few to no reactions have been reported.     Electro-acupuncture, natural hydrocortisone therapy, pulsed magnetic therapy, soft laser therapy and infrasonic therapy are other modalities that can be used in place of RVI therapy or sometimes along with it.

At this writing I have only performed this therapy on 5 animals and have had good success on three.    Of course if the above mentioned symptoms are a result of an acutely ruptured disk,  a spinal tumor or a fibro cartilaginous infarct the RVI series will probably not produce a significant change.

RVI therapy usually consists of a series of 6 daily injections.

**************************************************************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Holistic First Aid Options for Pets

Many books and articles contain information on pet first aid but few deal with first aid from a holistic perspective.  I will not attempt to make this section a complete discussion on first aid  but will simply recommend a number of holistic remedies that will give the pet care safe natural  options.   When giving homeopathic first aid remedies or Rescue Remedy you can place 4 to 5 drops directly in the pet,s mouth.   You can also add the  remedies to the pets drinking water.    10 drops in a quart of drinking water should be sufficient and then the container should be “sucussed” (shaken with concussion) 20 times.   You can then use this mixture as the sole source of drinking water by placing all or a portion of the container in the pets water dish..    If the pet is in a lot of discomfort or is otherwise having serious problems you can dose the pet, directly from the dropper bottle  as often as every fifteen minutes until improvement is seen.
Rescue Remedy is a liquid Bach Flower Remedy which helps pets deal with the emotional and psychological stress of injury.     It should be given every 15 minutes as soon after the injury as possible.

Nux Vomica 6X homeopathic is an antidote for bacterial, viral, or chemical toxins.

Thuja homeopathic is a therapy for preventing and treating post vaccination reactions

Thlaspi Bursa is an herbal remedy that can be  used to help relieve urethral obstructions commonly encountered by male cats.

Ledum 6X homeopathic can be used to treat puncture wounds and help prevent tetanus

Apis 6X homeopathic has been used successful to treat allergic reactions caused by insect bites

Ipecac 6X homeopathic can be used to help control vomiting

Arnica 6X homeopathic is quite effective in relieving muscle, joint and soft tissue pain

Anconitum 6X homeopathic is often given to bring down fever

Goldenseal 6X homeopathic

Echinacea 6X homeopathic is a natural antibacterial agent

Hypericum

Belladonna 6X homeopathic is helpful in treating heatstroke and seizures

Arsenicum Album 6X homeopathic is given to animal who are weak and exhausted

Kyolic garlic is a non specific poison antidote

Essential oil of Lavender should be applied to burns to help reduce damage.

Traumeel homeopathic ointment is an anti inflammatory remedy which relieves pain when rubbed on a injured area of the body

Systemic enzyme supplements are great for ligament, tendon, joint and muscle injury.  They are also very helpful in preventing infection and can be used with antibioti

Pedialyte can be given to pets who have lost fluid through diarrhea or vomiting in order to re establish normal electrolyte balance

Hydrogen Peroxide 3% can be used as both a flush for contaminated wounds or to stimulate dogs and cats to vomit up contaminated food or poisons

Eyebright herbal, boric acid, or contact lens solution can be used as an eye wash

Slippery Elm herbal remedy is helpful in treating diarrhea, vomiting and coughing.

Micronized charcoal absorbs intestinal toxins when consumption of poison is suspected

Colloidal Silver is a very effective  oral antimicrobial.  It could also be used as a wound flush or ear flush

Calendula herbal ointment can be used as an antibacterial wound ointment

Honey or a concentrated sugar solution  can be placed in wounds and are both effective antibacterials that can actually be more effective than antibiotics

Apple cider vinegar (organic, unfiltered and unpasteurized)

Yogurt or probiotics should be given to animals with diarrhea to help support the GI tract by restoring the number of good bacteria in the stool

Pumpkin for constipation

Aloe vera can be used topically on the skin for burns or taken orally as a gastro intestinal protectant
Number for the Animal Poison Hotline  for Pets: l 800 548 2423 or 900 680 0000 (fee charged)

****************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.     Visit us at www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,
Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, Grosse Pointe, Romeo and
Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

Alternative & Holistic Medicine: A second chance for dogs and pets

If your pet has a recurrent or chronic disease that has not responded to the best efforts of conventional medicine why not give alternative medicine / holistic medicine a chance to show what it can do. Recurrent ear infection, skin allergies, inflammatory bowel disease, and osteo-arthritis are just a few of the many chronic diseases that have conventionally required continual drug therapy to suppress symptoms which have been reducing the pets quality of life. These drugs may be temporarily successful at reducing symptoms but their long term use often results in side effects that may make the use of these drugs of questionable value.

Because alternative medicine takes a more holistic view point in its quest for healing it may focus on an organ system that appears to have no relationship to the symptoms that are being addressed. Since alternative medicine sees all organ systems as connected its therapy is often geared to using modalities that affect the organism as a whole rather than a drug geared to treat a symptom or the organ system where the symptoms occur.

When alternative medicine feels it must directly address symptoms the use of herbs, homeopathic remedies, specific nutrients, and plant produced hormones will accomplish the task with minimal side effects. Keep in mind that many of our most celebrated drugs were originally isolated from plants but then were concentrated and/or synthesized in laboratories. The extraction of active ingredient from the plant and the isolation of it from the other synergistic balancing chemicals found in the intact herb is what makes a drug more likely to produce side effects. Because drug production isolates and concentrates what it believes to be the “active ingredient” it looses the safety net that is present when using the whole herb with its less concentrated, better balanced mix of chemicals.

Alternative health care professionals believe that the pet owner should play an integral part in the healing of their pet. The practitioner believes that a partnership with the pet owner is necessary for the most rapid and successful healing to occur. In order for the pet owner to serve as an effective member of this healing partnership they must thoroughly understand their pets problem and the plan for healing. Consequently,  the holistic practitioner must schedule longer appointments to allow for client education and to answer all the pet owners questions.

Alternative veterinarians believe that inflammation resulting from nutritional and environmental toxicity in combination with nutritional deficiencies is one of the very basic causes for ill health. Minimizing toxin intake and maximizing toxin excretion is a very important aspect of holistic healing for health and healing.

******************************************************************************************************************

Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association.

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,
Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, Grosse Pointe, Romeo and
Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio