Archive for the ‘Alternative Medicine For Pets’ Category

PET SKIN ALLERGIES MAKE VETS AND PETS SCRATCH THEIR HEADS

 

Of all the different diseases veterinarians treat, “allergic inhalant dermatitis”, also known as “atopic dermatitis” or “atopy”, is no doubt the most frustrating for both owner and veterinarian alike.   Why is this you may ask?  Well in this article I will explain the many difficulties veterinarians run up against when trying to diagnose and treat a dog with “atopy”.   To begin with atopy must  first be diagnosed and distinguish from a number of other skin diseases which have as their main symptom itching and scratching.      These other conditions which must be ruled out before the diagnosis of “atopic dermatitis” can be made include mange, yeast and fungal infections, bacterial infections, food sensitivities, fleas and contact dermatitis.      To further confuse the diagnosis, pets with atopy often develop the secondary problems of yeast and bacterial infections and consequently more than one problem often exists at the same time.

To Further add  to both the veterinarian’s and owner’s frustration is the fact that atopy often causes intense itching and because the pet is so uncomfortable the pet owner is desperate to find some way to provide their pet “immediate” relief.     When these atopic dogs are scratching themselves raw it is initially necessary to break the “itch scratch cycle” with some form of cortico-steroid.    Although steroids are not the long term solution there is little else available that will give the necessary immediate relief.   Anti-histamines, fatty acid supplements,  oatmeal baths  or crème rinses, and herbal anti inflammatories may help some but rarely provide the immediate relief owners are expecting.     In spite of the fact that long term use of steroids has  unwanted side effects,  the short term use may be necessary to prevent self inflicted skin mutilation which leads to secondary bacterial infections .    Once the intense itching and scratching has subsided other supplements and medications may be used to replace steroid therapy.   Most veterinarians realize that steroid therapy is a stop gap measure that is simply treating the symptoms and not the cause of the problem, however, a short term, reducing dose course of steroids is often necessary until the other approaches have a chance to kick in.     As a holistic veterinarian I minimize many of the unwanted side effects of steroid therapy by using “natural hydrocortisone” rather than synthetic steroids like prednisone or prednisolone.

Another frustration veterinarian’s face in dealing with allergic inhalant dermatitis is the fact that many animals with atopy may, at the same time, have food sensitivities.    Allergic inhalant dermatitis usually starts out as a seasonal problem and progresses over several years to become a year round one.    Food sensitivities, on the other hand, are year round.    When animals have year round itching and scratching your veterinarian must try to discover whether the problem is atopy, food sensitivity or a combination of both.    If both airborne and food allergens are causing the dogs itching and scratching then both problems must be dealt with if the pet’s itching and scratching is to be minimized.   Because food allergies may be due to both the food and to chemicals added to the food, such as preservatives, coloring agents, flavor enhancers or texturizers, trying to discover the allergic component in the food is often quite difficult and requires the use of food trials that use limited ingredient diets.   A limited ingredient diet is defined as a diet that is made with only a single carbohydrate and a single protein source, such as duck and potato.    When attempting to reduce itching and scratching through a limited ingredient diet trial there is further frustration because the effects of the new diet can take up to 12 weeks to see if it is going to work.

Adding to the owner’s frustration is the fact that successfully treating atopic dermatitis usually requires that the pet be given several supportive drugs or nutritional supplements in addition to weekly baths that will help treat complicating yeast or bacterial infections.   It is also important to give liver and intestinal support supplements in order to reduce the number of air borne and food allergens entering the pet’s blood.   Veterinarians are well aware that giving a pet all these oral supplements along with weekly medicated bath requires a huge commitment on the part of the pet owner.    Understand that this commitment to daily therapy must go on for months.

If a pet owner makes this commitment and has conscientiously applied the therapeutic strategy for months with poor results then the next step would be to have the pet allergy tested in order to find which airborne allergens are causing the intense itching.    Once the offending airborne allergens have been identified a “hyposensitizing serum” made up of these allergens can be prepared and the owner can be taught how to give simple periodic injection just under the skin.    Unfortunately allergy testing and subsequent desensitization can be expensive and is not guaranteed to work.     To add to the frustration it can take up to 9 months of allergy serum injections to determine if the  hypo- sensitization approach will provide the answer.

By now I think it should be obvious that diagnosing and treating a dog or cat with allergic inhalant dermatitis is huge undertaking for both veterinarian and pet owner alike.   A thorough exam and careful history is just the beginning.   Periodic recheck exams at 3 to 4 week intervals will be necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment.    Changes in treatment may be necessary depending on how the pet’s skin is responding and how uncomfortable the pet is.     Following the veterinarian’s instructions to the letter is extremely important in order for him or her to judge whether therapeutic changes must be made.

Besides the above conventional approach to treating pets with skin allergies, holistic veterinarian can add acupuncture, herbal therapy, NAET, bio identical natural hormone therapy, FSM therapy, and monolaurin therapy.

For more on alternative and holistic medicine please visit  us at www.doc4pets.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEGENERATIVE KIDNEY DISEASE AND KIDNEY FAILURE

Kidney failure is the number one killer of older cats and dogs.    If a dog or cat lives to a ripe old age the likelihood is that degenerative kidney disease will progress to kidney failure and finally take his or her life.    Kidney disease is a slow, progressive process that begins in youth and little by little destroys so many kidney cells that the organ ceases to function properly.   Unfortunately symptoms of kidney damage do not appear until late in the process when at least 70% of the functional kidney is destroyed.   Consequently, a pet owner will have no idea that a serious problem exists until the disease has reached an advanced and critical stage.   Semi annually testing your senior pets urine and blood will detect kidney disease somewhat earlier than waiting for symptoms to appear.    A relatively new urine test known as the ERD (Early Renal Disease) will detect evidence of kidney disease which might be missed by a standard urinalysis.   It is important to not that unlike the liver, when kidney cells die they are not replaced.   That is to say that the liver has regenerative capabilities not found in the kidney.    Consequently, serious damage done to the kidney is permanent.    Each year our pets loose a little more of there kidney function until the critical stage of kidney failure is reached.   Things that can destroy your pets kidneys include:  Bacterial infections, food and environmental toxins, allergic reactions, auto immune disease, trauma, high blood pressure, drugs and any inflammatory reaction in the body.    Once enough damage is done to the kidneys the organ becomes progressively less efficient at removing metabolic toxins from the cat or dogs blood and toxins build up until death occurs.   Symptoms of advanced kidney disease include weight loss, increased drinking and urinating,  and loss of house training.    If any of these symptoms are noticed it is important to make an appointment with your veterinarian and bring in a urine sample for testing.

Traditionally kidney failure is treated with a prescription kidney diet and the administration of subcutaneous (under the skin) fluid therapy to help rehydrate the pet and to flush toxins out of the body and a faster rate.   Fortunately, with alternative medicine and holistic veterinary care,  we have a number of additional options can help to prolong your dog or cats life.    Oral or injectable antioxidant therapy will help neutralize many of the free radicals which are destroying the kidney cells.   Important antioxidants include coenzyme Q10, alpha lipoic acid,  resveratrol and nega hydrate.   The use of Celtic sea salt will help reduce acidity which develops with progressive kidney damage.   Chiropractic care helps support the bodies ability to neurologically control the kidney.   There are very specific acupuncture points which address kidney issues and are very useful at helping with kidney failure.   Systemic enzyme therapy utilizes powerful proteolytic enzymes which once in the kidney reduce inflammation and dissolve scaring which inhibits kidney function.     Pulsed magnetic therapy can help to rehabilitate kidney cell that have been damaged but are functioning poorly.    Pulsed magnetic therapy works  by restoring diminished cellular voltage that is necessary for the cell to perform its many activities.   “Frequency specific microcurrent” is a holistic modality which uses very specific electrical frequencies to slow the progression of kidney damage.  A chinese herbal remedy known as Rehmania has been used in Asia for centuries in the treatment of kidney disease.   Although stem cell therapy for treating kidney disease is not yet a possibility it is exciting to know that scientist are very close to making this a reality for our dogs and cats.

Because the loss of kidney cells from disease is presently permanent any thing you can do through out your pets life to avoid such damage makes so much more sense than trying to treat an already diseased kidney.    Protecting your pet’s kidneys begins with proving your pet a clean and healthy life style.   A superior diet that has a minimal number of chemical toxins that may be present  in the form of preservatives,  artificial coloring agents,  and chemical texturizures.   Other toxins encountered may enter your pets  food accidently or intentionally such what when cows were accidently fed fire retardant chemicals or when the chinese provide food ingredients that contained melamine.   Of course, a superior food not only avoids dangerous toxins it also has a full compliment of nutritional ingredients that are essential for the proper functioning of the liver and immune system.   Such a diet will be much better prepared to fight off invading bacteria and to remove ingested toxins from the blood stream.    Providing fresh, alkalinized water which contains few or no toxins is very important for the health of the  kidneys and the body as a whole.    Unfortunately with the limited space available it is impossible to go into more detail about optimal nutrition.       For a much more in depth discussion on optimal nutrition for dogs and cats you can visit either of my website doc4pets.com or my blog myholisticpetvet.com

 

Kidney disease is a silent killer that is much better prevented than treated.   Unfortunately,  avoiding damaging substances in our environment, food and water is becoming more and more difficult given the toxic world we and our pets live in.   All we can do is our best to help our pets live a clean and healthy life.

For mor information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

 

What Is The Difference Between Holistic and Homeopathic Medicine?

Are you confused by the difference between the terms holistic medicine, homeopathic medicine , alternative medicine, complementary medicine, integrative medicine, natural medicine, vibrational medicine, energy medicine, herbal medicine,  and botanical medicine.   Well don’t feel alone, many  are .   Therefore let me attempt to help clear things up.

Holistic medicine is an umbrella term that includes such therapies as:  clinical nutrition, acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, homotoxicology, functional medicine, herbal or botanical medicine, prolo therapy,  vibrational or energy medicine, detoxification and more.  Holistic medicine views the body as a whole and not as a bunch of isolated organs or organ systems.   The holistic point of view is that no one system functions on its own .   A disease which may on the surface appear to affect only one  organ system actually affects all systems.     Holistic medicine does not attempt to name  or treat individual diseases but does attempt to identify and correct  abnormal body  functions which may underlie many diseases.     Holistic medicine believes that the major underlying causes of  dysfunction include:  malnutrition,  a leaky gut, an unbalanced immune system, an out of control inflammatory response,  poor detoxification,  a deficiency of antioxidants,  a loss of cellular communication, excessive physical and psychologic stress,   spinal misalignment,  neurotransmitter  imbalance and poor hormonal control.

Vibrational medicine, also known as energy medicine or bio resonance therapy,  is another broad category under holistic medicine.   Vibrational medicine includes soft laser therapy, homeopathy, pulsed magnetic therapy, infrasonic therapy, electro-crystal therapy, frequency specific micro current, color therapy and aroma therapy.    All of these different vibrational modalities utilize different forms of energetic vibrations to either reestablish health using resonance frequencies  or destroy  harmful bacteria or viruses using destructive frequencies.    Vibrational medicine also includes the area of hands on healing      Keep in mind that our most brilliant quantum physicist tell us that our world is not that of particles but of waves and frequencies. There is truly nothing solid about are reality.    We and our pets are in a very real sense  energy beings and given that context disease is really a body that is out of tune. Healing then is simply the retuning of the body to a state of vibrational harmony.

Alternative medicine, complimentary medicine, and integrative medicine are all terms that have all been used in place of holistic medicine.   Of these terms integrative medicine comes the closest to the description I use for holistic medicine because it implies the use of both holistic and traditional medicine together.   In its truest form holistic medicine does not exclude traditional medicine but embraces its judicious use when the situation call for it.

“Homeopathy”  is the term that is most often confused with the term  and used in place of  the term “holistic”.   New pet owners who are looking for a holistic veterinary care all too often request the homeopathic approach.   Understand that homeopathy is a specific type of holistic medicine which uses very dilute homeopathic remedies to heal patient.   On the other hand holistic medicine includes not only homeopathy but also many other holistic approaches like acupuncture and chiropractic.

For more information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets .

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lumps, Bumps and Cancer in Pets

If your dog or cat has a lump or bump anywhere on his or her body it could be early cancer.    A simple physical exam can not determine whether the bump is a malignant tumor, cancer,  or a benign mass.   Commonly given advice by veterinarians is to watch a mass and see if it grows or changes.    Unfortunately,  such advice  may jeopardize the animal’s life.   Waiting to see if the mass grows may waste valuable therapeutic time if the mass turns out to be cancer.   Lumps developing on or under the skin are often benign tumors but there is no sure  way to know visually or by feel.    Such lumps may be cysts, abscesses, or benign fatty tumors or a life threatening cancer.    It is very important to evaluate such a growth as soon as possible by either a needle aspiration biopsy and/or excision of the entire mass.    Either the aspiration biopsy of the mass  or complete excision will provide a specimen that can be sent to the laboratory  for a complete microscopic evaluation by  a pathologist.    This way cancers can be identified and removed before they have had a chance to spread to other areas of the body.     Pet owners should be made aware that what often appears to be a benign fatty growth can not be distinguished from a cancerous mast cell tumor by simply feeling it .     Of course, non cancerous fatty tumors are by far more common than cancerous mast cell tumors but playing the odds is not a good idea when loosing the bet might mean your pet could die from  cancer.   If the lump turns out not to be a tumor but, on the other hand ,  a cyst,  or abscess the  mass can be either opened up and its contents cleaned out or it could be removed in its entirety and thrown out with the trash.     If cryo surgery is to be used to remove the growth then excising a small piece of tissue before the freezing begins will allow tissue to be sent to the pathologist .

If you feel any sort of mass on your dog or cats body please do not sit around and watch it growth.  Schedule an appointment with your veterinarian so that he can give you his honest opinion about how to proceed.

For more information on holistic or alternative mediicine please visit www.doc4pets.com

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Treating Spondylosis & Disk Disease With Rubeola Viral Immunomodulator

Rubeola Virus Immunomodulator (RVI) is an extremely dilute injection of Rubeola virus.   It was originally licensed  for veterinary use to treat myositis and fibromyalgia in horses.   It has recently become available to small animal veterinarians but only with specific stipulations.   The use of RVI in small animals has been primarily for the treatment of spondylosis and intervertebral disk disease.  However Iam sure it also helps muscle inflammation as it does in horses.   Back in 1992 Dr. Don Polley wrote an article in a veterinary journal which discusses his experience using RVI on dogs.    In this article he was extremely enthusiastic about his results and it was because of this article that I became interested in the product.   When I first tried to get a bottle of RVI  I was told it was not yet available for use in Michigan but later was approved for veterinary use for dogs but only after the veterinarian got  special written permission  from the  Office of the State Veterinarian.
Spondylosis is an arthritic disease which produces “bone spurs” at the end of each vertebra.   These bone spurs continue to enlarge and will eventually bridge the intervertebral disk space and form a calcified splint across the joint.    It Is believed that the formation of these spurs , bridges and calcified splints is the body’s way of stabilizing a hyper-mobile joint that results from a disk collapse.   If these bone spurs become large enough they will impinge on the spinal nerve root and slow nerve transmission.    Bone spurs and calcified bridges can easily be seen radiographically.   Often multiple vertebral segments are involve.   Giving  a series of  RVI injections can reduce inflammation,  restore the nerve transmission and strengthen the gait.     The injections are given just under the skin and not in the muscle so they are not uncomfortable.     Response to these injection is often  rapid and within 1 week to 10 days we will usually be able to determine if therapy was successful.     Success is based on the disappearance of such symptoms as hind leg weakness,  knuckling over and dragging the toes, and a drunken appearance to the gait.   RVI injections  are quite safe and few to no reactions have been reported.     Electro-acupuncture, natural hydrocortisone therapy, pulsed magnetic therapy, soft laser therapy and infrasonic therapy are other modalities that can be used in place of RVI therapy or sometimes along with it.

At this writing I have only performed this therapy on 5 animals and have had good success on three.    Of course if the above mentioned symptoms are a result of an acutely ruptured disk,  a spinal tumor or a fibro cartilaginous infarct the RVI series will probably not produce a significant change.

RVI therapy usually consists of a series of 6 daily injections.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional andalternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

A Natural Approach to Chronic or Recurrent Infections In Pets

If  your dog or cat is prone to recurrent or chronic infections the important question you must ask your self is–Why is this happening ?       Is there a genetic weakness in your pet’s immune system?   Is there a nutritional deficiency  that  weakens the immune response.  Is the environment  your pet  lives  stressful  and suppressing the immune system?   Does your pet’s living area harbor hidden sources of infectious or parasitic dangers.?  Is there a thyroid deficiency  which suppresses the immune response?  Is your pet’s  diet inadequate in some way such that the raw materials needed for a healthy immune are missing?    Does your pet have allergies or an auto immune disease that predisposes  the animal  to secondary bacterial infections?   Does your pet have intestinal or external parasites?

Not all animals  are born with a genetically strong immune systems.    These genetically challenged pets may show a tendency to develop recurrent skin, ear, bladder,  kidney and lung infections,  to name just a few.    We can’t eliminate the animal’s genetic weakness but we can support the immune system in several ways.    A superior commercial diet or, better yet, homemade diet will contain all of the necessary nutrients the body needs to manufacture essential immune system molecules.   Adding nutritional supplements to an already good diet can help to either plug nutritional holes or raise the level of specific vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, enzymes and antioxidants which are instrumental in establishing a strong immune system.    Homemade, meat based, low grain diets that are prepared by following a professionally developed recipe is what I recommend for those caregivers who have the time to do so.    To protect immune compromised pets from the danger of bacteria contaminated meat I recommend searing the meat before grinding it and then adding the seared ground meat to the rest of the homemade diet.

Caregivers of pets with immune weakness should be particularly concerned with their pet’s hygiene, including the skin, coat, ears, and teeth.     Routine grooming to remove mats, dirt, fleas, ticks, lice,   and foreign materials such as burrs will go a long way in taking stress off the immune system.    Weekly ear cleanings will remove dirt and wax in the ear canal which if left will predispose to infection.    Regular home and professional dental care is next only to good nutrition in helping to support the immune system.     Tartar formation, gum disease, and periodontal disease are serious threats to a healthy immune system.    By reducing the bacterial population of your pet’s mouth with good conscientious home and professional dental care,  you greatly lower the chance that oral bacteria can get into your pets blood stream and cause heart or kidney disease.

If your pet has skin or respiratory allergies or is suffering from and an auto-immune disease such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) then infectious diseases are very likely to follow.    Allergies result in inflammation of the skin and mucus membranes of the gastro-intestinal and respiratory tract.    When healthy, the skin and mucus membranes of the body are natural barriers that block the invasion of bacteria into the deeper tissues, however, when allergies or autoimmune disease injure these natural barriers they can no longer act as a formidable defense and secondary yeast and bacterial infections appear.

A pet that  is constantly anxious and under stress is much more likely to develop infections than a pet that lives in a quiet, peaceful, loving environment.    If you have a pet that has not been properly trained and and needs to be constantly reprimanded for soiling the house, chewing on furniture , barking excessively,  or biting people  then you have a home environment that is unhealthy  and stressful for both you and your pet.      A pet that is not a good citizen and is disrupting the household is hard to love and welcome as a positive contribution to the family.     Proper obedience training early in the life of the pet will pay back dividends in both the physical and psychological health of your pet and entire family.

If you have a pet who has a history of chronic infections requiring long term or frequent antibiotic therapy but the condition never really clears up consider my above advice.    However, if nothing seems to prevent recurrence  of infection  then consider using the following natural remedies in place of long term antibiotics:    Olive leaf extract,  Echinacea, Goldenseal,   colloidal silver,   Iodine,  thyroid supplementation, zinc,   vitamin C,  astragalus,  mushroom therapy,  systemic enzymes,  and monolaurin.   Please understand that chronic  or recurrent infections are serious business so find an experienced  holistic veterinarian who will be best able to assess you pet’s condition and advise you on how to create an effective natural antibacterial regiment.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional  and alternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in acupuncture, chiropractic and stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the
American Holistic Veterinary Associatio.n

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties include Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,
Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, Grosse Pointe, Romeo and Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Holistic Prevention & Treatment of Kidney Disease in Dogs and Cats: Kidney Failure

It is hard for any owner that loves their dog or cat to become comfortable with the fact that these pets age so much more rapidly than we do. This accelerated aging is even more obvious in the larger breeds of dogs that begin to reach their geriatric years between 8 and 10 years of age. A pet’s kidneys are often the weakest link in the aging process and all to frequently the cause of old age death. Things that pet owners can do to support their pet’s ailing kidneys are as follows:

Feed a higher fiber, low protein, high quality protein diet prescription kidney diet available from all veterinarians– or — feed a home made kidney diet by following a receipe that we make available to our patients. The diet will decrease the formation of waste protein toxins, discourage obesity and reduce the work load of the kidney.  The home made kidney diet can be fed either raw  or cooked.

Encourage your dog or cat to drink more by providing lots of fresh water throughout the day. Doing this will promote proper hydration while at the same time flush the kidney and reduce accumulating protein derived toxins. Adding Celtic sea salt to the pet’s food will encourgage drinking, provide trace minerals he or she are likely to be deficient in, and alkalinize the animal’s body. Checking the pet’s blood pressure is recommended, especially when adding salt to the diet, to help detect hypertension often caused by kidney failure. Make sure your dog or cat receives a regular dental prophylaxis to reduce oral bacteria which are injurious to the animals kidneys, liver, and heart. Daily  home dental care is essential for over all good health but particularly important for avoiding progressive kidney damage.

Supplement your dog or cat’s diet with anti-oxidants, systemic enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and glandulars to reduce kidney tissue injury by free radicals and to stimulate natural immunity. Omega 3 fatty acids, Coenzyme Q10 and alpha lipoic acid are 3 important supplements that promotes kidney health.  Systemic enzymes have been shown to reduce scar tissue in the  kidneys of aging dogs and cats.  Homeopathics remedies that can be placed in the pet’s drinking water help promote kidney health  and are easy to administer.   Of course it is better to begin these supplements early on in life before the kidneys have received significant damage and symptoms become apparent. Strategically detoxifying the body with special homotoxicologic and nutritional formulas is an important adjunct to avoiding or treating  kidney disease and most any other disease in the body. Starting these same supplements after kidney damage or kidney failure has been detected will help conserve the remaining kidney cells but will not restore the cells that have died.

Have your veterinarian perform semi annual blood and urine testing to monitor your dog or cat’s  kidney function and to provide an early warning system for the development of other degenerative disease.  Recently a new urine test, the “ERD”  micro albuminuria test, has become available. The ERD test requires only a small amount of urine and can detect evidence of kidney disease much earlier than blood tests and a standard urinalysis.  Any dog or cat over the age of 6 years old should be routinely tested with an ERD test because not only does it detect kidney disease but it is also a screen for inflammatory disease of many other organs.

Acupuncture and chinese herbs like Rehmania have been quite helpful in supporting kidney function.    Electro acupuncture  or laser acupuncture can be performed without needles at the veterinary clinic while  acupressure using the same acupuncture points can be performed at home by the pet’s guardian.     Recent scientific literature out of Europe has shown infrared laser therapy to provide beneficial effects in both kidney and liver disease.  Pulsed magnetic therapy is totally painless and will help restore voltage to damaged kidney cells.    Electro crystal rebalancing (ECR)  is a therapy that broadcast energetic frequency of the chakras to rebalance the body’s energy.    The ECR device  can also be used energize subcutaneous fluids that are commonly sent home with kidney patient to help maintain hydration.   Frequency specific micro current therapy is  a relatively new form of therapy that can be applied over the kidney area and is totally painless and easy to perform.    Infrasonic therapy is another painless therapy that uses a combination of sound and light frequencies to restore cellular function to the kidneys.   Routine chiropractic care can help support kidney health by better establishing nerve conduction to the kidneys. Finally, ozonation of subcutaneous fluid will oxygenate and alkalinize the body and restore voltage to damaged, failing kidney cells.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties include  Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, Grosse Pointe, Romeo and Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Convulsions: Animal Epilepsy and Holistic Seizure Therapy for Dogs

If your pet occasionally displays brief moments of unconsciousness,  sudden stiffening, or outright seizures your pet may be epileptic.

The most common causes for the above symptoms and  history  are:   1) a “petit mal”  or “grand mal” seizure  or  2) a syncopal episode.   Now When most people think of an epileptic seizure they think of a “grand mal” seizure. This is a seizure where the entire body becomes rigid, the neck arches backward, the teeth are clenched shut, and the whole body trembles violently. There is, however, another  type of epileptic seizure which is much quieter and less violent.  This type of seizure is called a “petit mal” seizure and is characterized by a momentry loss of consciousness. The cause of an epileptic seizure, grand or petit,  is the misfiring of neurons in the brain.

Syncopy or a ”syncopal episode” may be mistaken for a ”petit seizure because it causes a momentary loss of consciousness but unlike seizures it is caused by a heart problem producing a momentary loss of blood to the brain.

Regardless of which of the two above possibilities is the actual cause of the problem it is very important that you take your pet to your veterinarian to have a diagnostic workup performed so that he or she can come to a definite conclusion and treat the specific diagnosis accordingly. Both of the possible causes can develop into life threatening conditions and therefore you should not wait until the problem becomes worse before seeking veterinary care.  Your veterinarian, after performing a detailed physical exam, will most likely want to send a sample of your pet’s blood and urine to the laboratory for  a general diagnostic screen and urinalysis.  He will , no doubt,  also perform an electrocardiogram (ECG) in an attempt to distinguish any heart condition that may be the basis of the problem.  He may even decide to take chest and abdominal radiographs.

If the blood report, urinalysis,  the ECG, and the radiographs all turn out to be normal then your veterinarian will, through a  process of elimination, diagnose your pet with epilepsy.  If the diagnosis actually is epilepsy then oral anticonvulsant will be prescribed.  If the problem turns out to be a heart related problem such as an “arrhythmia” a medication to regulate the heart rate and rhythm will be prescribed.

Because anti-convulsant drugs such as Phenobarbital often cause pets to change personality and appear drugged pet owners often stop the therapy or reduce the dose to below therapeutic levels.  Consequently the seizures are poorly controlled.   Pet owners should know that there are alternative, non drug methods of preventing epilepsy.  Herbal therapy, neuro transmitter therapy and nutritional supplements  can be used alone or in combination with drugs to help control seizures, lower drug dosages and minimize  drug related behavioral effects.   Acupuncture and gold bead implantation under the skin of the pets head and ears are additional ways of controlling seizure.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties.   Cities in these counties include:  Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe,  Romeo and Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint ,Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Cold Laser Therapy for Animals – A Non Surgical Approach to Pain & Lameness

The future is here and medicine is now able to heal tissue with light frequencies, sound frequencies and pulsed magnetic waves.    The  most futuristic of all healing modalities is the use of  low energy laser beams  to heal tissue, reduce pain, and provide the patient additional energy.   The term laser is an acronym that stands for  “Light Amplification thru Stimulated Emission of Radiation.  There are both high power and low power lasers.   The high powered “hot” lasers are cutting lasers and are used in surgery, industry, or by the defense department.  The low power or cold lasers are used  in supermarket barcode readers, compact disc players, lecture pointers, laser light shows and medicine.    The therapeutic uses for  low energy soft lasers in medicine includes the promotion of tissue healing and the reduction of pain and swelling.   Lasers are being used by medical doctors, veterinarians, dentists, chiropractors and  physical therapists.  Holistic equine veterinarians have used lasers to perform acupuncture and treat joints for over 20 years.  The first therapeutic lasers produced were either infrared or red radiation.   More recently green and blue lasers have come in use.  Each colored laser has advantages and disadvantages over the others.   Regardless of color these low energy lasers produce no heat and there are very safe to use with the exception of the danger they may pose to the eyes if the patient or physician stares directly into the beam.

It was in 1973 that Friedrich Plog in Canada discovered that lasers could be used in place of needles to stimulate acupuncture points.  Later that decade Dr. Endre Mester a professor in Butapest performed a number of animal studies and subsequent human trials where he used laser irradiation to heal patients suffering from chronic unhealed wounds that were unresponsive to other treatments.  These patients provided the first direct evidence of the photobiostimulative potential of low energy laser therapy in humans.

Based on the reported successes of Plog and  Mester a range of research projects were intiated, principally in eastern Europe, China and the Soviet Union.  The positive findings of this research has resulted in cold laser therapy becoming a popular modality in those countries and is reflected in the large number or researched papers which originated from these countries.   However for some reason the acceptance of  soft  l laser therapy in the USA has been much slower to catch on and many new innovative lasers licensed in Europe have not been licensed by the FDA.

Within the medical profession the  use of low level laser therapy is most enthusiastically used by  physiotherapist.  In a survey of physical therapists they rated low level laser therapy more effective than any other form of electrotherapeutic modalities including, ultrasound and pulsed electromagnetic therapy when it came to wound healing, pain relief and the reduction of tissue swelling (edema) .   I have used red and infrared lasers to  treat dogs and cats for arthritis, hip dysplasia, intervertebral disk disease, spinal arthritis (spondylosis) and torn cruciate ligaments.

I have recently updated my  class 3B laser to a class 4 laser.     The increased power allows for greater tissue penetration and greatly reduces the time it takes to a painful or debilitated dog or cat.    It also allows for treatment without the need to shave the hair on thick coated pets.  Frequently I will combine this new laser therapy with prolotherapy or acupuncture hasen clinical results.

Low level laser therapy may be applied directly to the skin or applied from 1 to 3 inches above the skin.  This form of laser application is referred to as “transcutaneous” (through the skin).     When applied to the skin red lasers penetrate only to a depth of   1/8 inch whereas infra red lasers can penetrate to a depth of 8 cm. and can actually have an effect on internal organs.   When applied to vascular areas of the skin, lasers can  be used to irradiate circulating red blood cells and produce a systemic effect. .   Lasers can also  irradiate blood through  intravenous application.   Regardless of which method is used the effects of laser blood irradiation are as follows:

1.   an improved immune system function with increased numbers of white cells(lymphocytes and phagocytic neutrophils  which engulf bacteria)

2.   a reduction in blood clotting time making strokes less likely

3.  an increase in microcirculation and tissue oxygenation

4.  an  increase in cellular energy production (ATP) through stimulation of the  mitochondria

5.  a relief of pain and swelling

6.  provides antispasmotic, anti inflammatory effects

7.   improves liver and kidney function

8.  Stimulates microcirculation in the central nervous system- specifically the hypothalamus and  limbic systems leading to stimulation of hormonal, metabolic, immunologic, and    autonomic nervous system function

9.    stimulates the the antioxidant enzyme system

10   improves the red blood cell regeneration (erythrogenesis)

Specific Applications

1.  Intervertebral disk disease (slipped disk in back)

2.  Degenerative joint disease

3.  Cruciate ligament tears

4.  Soft tissue injuries: muscle, tendon, and ligament strains and sprains

5.  Acute and chronic ear disease

6.  Sinusitis and rhinits

7.  Pre and post surgical care

8.  Wound care

9.  Re energizing sick and debilitated animals

10.  Rehabilitation and physical therapy

11.  Immune system support

12.  Autoimmune disease

13.  Acute and chronic pain relief

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties.   Cities in these counties include Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park,  Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe,  Romeo, Shelby township, Washington, Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

THE IMPORTANCE OF HOME DENTAL CARE FOR PETS

Next to great nutrition,  the one thing caregivers can do to extend the quality and length of their pet’s life is to provide them with good dental care, both at home and professionally.    Regular home dental care is more important for your pet than for yourself.   You may wonder why I feel that way.   Well if you consider that dogs and cats age roughly 7 times faster than humans and that humans are advised to have their teeth clean every 6 months (even when no tartar is visible)  then in order to clean our dog and cat’s teeth proportionately as often we would need to give them a  prophylaxis a little over once a month.    Of course this is obsurd and impracticle to say the least, so most veterinarians compromise and recommend once a year cleaning.      This recommended frequency for a dental prophylaxis equates to cleaning our own teeth once every 14  years .    Can you imagine what your hygenist would say if you came in for your once every 14 year teeth cleaning and told her you had not brushed since the last one.   Given the above information,  you can now understand that,  because of the proportionately greater length of time between teeth cleanings, your pet’s need for home dental care is more important  than your own.

Understand that tartar is a great breeding ground for bacteria and bacterial toxins.    These bacteria and toxins are easily absorbed into you  pet’s circulation  where they pass, via the blood stream, to the liver, kidney, and heart.   Once reaching these vital organs,  the toxins produce unseen damage on a regular day after day basis.    In the begining no symptoms  are noticed but after 5 or 10 years of progressive toxic  damage, organ injury reachs the point  where  the organ  can no longer function properly.    At first there are only abnormal blood tests with no symptoms but as damage progresses  physical symptoms appear.    It often appears to  care giver  that their pet just became sick when, in truth, he or she had been sick for several years.

My point is that daily home dental care is essential in reducing toxic and free radical damage to your pet’s vital organs.     If you simply rely on the annual professional dental prophylaxsis to get rid of your pet’s tartar and do nothing in between  you will have allowed considerable irreparable  damage to occur in the interim.

You response to my above recommendation might be,  ”Dr. Simon, that’s all well and good but I don’t have time to struggle with my dog or cat on a daily basis”.   My reply is that there are a number of  approachs  that make daily dental care easy.    The one I recommend is that my clients use a product known as “Maxigaurd Oral Gel”.   The gel is really a solution of zinc vitamin C which when simply smeared on the upper gums will reduce the build up of tartar,  bacteria and their toxins.   Once getting use to using it,  the process should take no more than 30 seconds.   This daily dental hygiene is part of our overall dental program that includes an annual dental cleaning.  Daily oral vitamin C tablets and Coenzyme Q10 will go along way to encourage healthy gums

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, ferrets rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine. Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy. He is the author of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and past board member of the  American Holistic Veterinary Association.   Visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit area including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston and Washtenaw counties. Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson, Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms,  Franklin, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Northville,Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Clarkston, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica, White Lake, Grosse Pointe, Romeo, Swartz Creek,  Shelby township, Washington,  Flint, Hartland, Lansing, Okemos, Howell, Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio