VESTIBULAR DISEASE: A DIZZY DIAGNOSIS

Vestibular disease or Vestibular syndrome is a debilitating disease that often comes on suddenly and  produces the classic signs of head tilt, dizziness and falling to one side or the other.   The pet may hold his or her head  tilted down and circle in one direction.  The dog or cat appears dizzy and often has a hard time rising.  The disease is seen most often in dogs, cats and rabbits but can also be seen in rodents.  It occurs more frequently in older animals but can be seen at any age.     Other common signs are jerking of the eyes back  and forth (nystagmus) and vomiting.    The symptoms of vestibular disease are in fact much like sea sickness.

Vestibular disease can originate either in the inner ear or the brain stem.  If the inner ear is the problem, the condition is known as “peripheral vestibular syndrome”.   If the brain stem is the location of the disease then the condition is  known as “central vestibular disease”.    It is not easy to distinquish between the two because the inner ear can not be visualized when examining the ear with an otoscope.     Peripheral vestibular syndrome is most often the result of an inner ear infection but can also result from a polyp or tumor.   Peripheral vestibular disease  can some times be detected with x-rays but in other cases an MRI may be necessary to distinquish between the two conditions.  Central vestibular disease, on the other hand,  involves the portion of the brain stem known as the “cerebellum” and may result from an infection,  tumor, or some other inflammatory disease.

Once the origin of the problem is determined treatment maybe as easy as oral medications while other times surgery may be necessary.  Additional medication may be necessary to reduce nausea and vomiting.   Of course, if a tumor is discovered then most likely surgery will be necessary.  How quickly your pet recovers depends on the underlying cause.

A condition very similar to the above described problem is known as “Idiopathic Vestibular Disease”.   The term idiopathic means a disorder that has no known cause.    It is most commonly occurs in older dogs and cats.   Fortunately, it carries a good prognosis.

Alternative/holistic therapies that can help a pet recover more quickly from the problem include acupuncture, “Cytokine therapy”, micro-current therapy, monolaurin therapy, and homotoxicology.   For more information on holistic health care  visit www.doc4pets.com

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

PET PAIN GO AWAY

Just as there are many types of pain there are many ways to treat pain in both pets and people. Pets can become painful for numerous reasons. Dogs and cats experience bone pain, joint pain, ligament pain, tendon pain, skeletal muscle pain, neurologic pain and internal organ pain. Depending on the type of pain your pet is experiencing there specific therapies will help relieve the pain.

Probably the most common type of pain pets experience is musculoskeletal pain. Osteoarthritis is the most well known cause of pain in older animals. Arthritis can be seen in both young and old pets but by far osteoarthritis is the most common type of old age disease that veterinarians treat on a daily basis. Traditional veterinarians treat arthritis with non steroidal anti inflammatories and narcotic pain killers. And although these remedies often work quite well to relieve pain and inflammation when used long term they can not only damage the pet’s joints but also cause liver, kidney and gastro-intestinal damage. That is why holistic veterinarians prefer to use therapies that not only relieve pain but also help repair damage tissue. Acupuncture, chiropractic, micro-current therapy, infra-sonic therapy, pulsed magnetic therapy, cytokine therapy and homotoxicology are all effective pain relievers and help repair damaged tissue. Said another way, these therapies do not just mask the pain; they also help the body repair itself.

A torn cruciate ligament in a dog’s knee is quite painful and probably the most common orthopedic injury a dog incurs. It is almost always an injury of large dogs. A common history veterinarian here is that when the owner let the dog outside he or she was walking perfectly normal but walked back in with a painful hind leg limp. Traditional veterinarians recommend that these dogs -have the leg surgically repaired. However, many holistic veterinarians know about a technique known as prolotherapy which they can use in place of conventional surgery. Prolotherapy involves a series of monthly injections of a special “sclerosing agent in and around the damaged joint. These injections create inflammation which eventually causes scar tissue to form and tighten the hyper-mobile, painful joint. Once the joint is tightened the dog can once again walk without pain. Cold laser therapy, cytokine therapy and adequin therapy can all be used along with prolotherapy in order to repair a damaged painful knee joint.

Injuries that involve a dog’s spine are extremely painful and the pet may litterly scream out in agony. Spinal cord pain may result from inter-vertebral disk degeneration or hyper-mobile vertebrae as are present in Wobblers disease. Ruptured inter-vertebral disks can be present anywhere along the spine and put pressure on the spinal cord. The muscle spasms that results from a ruptured disk putting pressure on the spinal cord are excruciatingly painful. Traditional veterinary medicine recommends the use of prednisone, muscle relaxants, narcotic analgesics and spinal cord decompression surgery. On the other hand holistic veterinarians recommend electro-acupuncture, micro-current therapy, pulsed magnetic therapy, infrasonic therapy, systemic enzymes, and cytokine therapy.

Dr. Jerry Tennant has discovered that where ever there is chronic pain there is almost always an area of low voltage or increased acidity. Consequently, in order for chronic pain to be alleviated and for healing to begin tissue voltage must initially be increased to greater than what is considered normal voltage. Once the tissue has healed the voltage decreases to normal. The additional voltage needed for healing can be obtained by reducing tissue acidity or increasing alkalinity. This can be accomplished thru adding antioxidants to the pet’s body, adding oxygen, or by using electrical magnetic devices which add electrons to the pet’s body. Such devices include the Russian Scenar, the Tennant Biomodulator, and pulsed magnetic therapy units.    To learn more about holistic methods of healing visit  www.Doc4pets.com

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

Feline Gum and Mouth Disease: Lymphocytic Plasmacytic Gingivits Stomatitis

Because few pet owners care for their pets teeth as well as they take care of their own, low grade gingivitis and periodontitis after 3 years of age, is a very common disease in both dogs and cats.  For the most part, daily home dental care care and an annual dental prophylaxis can control such problems.   However there is a much more serious gum and mouth disease of cats known as “Lymphocytic plasmatcytic gingivitis stomatitis (LPGS)” which is difficult to treat and often results in full mouth extractions.    Before I tell you more about this disease, let us define a few words: Gingivitis refers to inflammation of the gums;  Somatitis refers to inflammation of the mouth as a whole:   Periodontitis refers a progressive inflammation disease of the gums where the bone surrounding the teeth starts to recede.

The exact cause of LPGS is unknown but it is most likely a combination of multiple factors which together create chronic inflammation that eventually results in an auto immune disease.   One theory is that some cats are hypersensitive to bacterial plaque which causes the immune system to over react and mount an extreme inflammatory response that drives a large numbers of white cells, mainly lymphocytes and plasma cells, into the oral tissue.   Other theories implicate feline leukemia, feline immune deficiency virus, and a bacteria known as Bartonella.   Environmental stressors that weaken the cat’s immune system must also be considered to play a part in the disease process.   It has also been proposed that there may be a genetic breed predilection.

As LPGS progresses the major symptoms displayed are results of gum and mouth pain.   Cats have difficulty eating and may even stop eating entirely.   Often cats will approach their food dish as if interested in eating but then run from the food because eating is painful.   Other cats may be fearful of having their face touched.    Owners may notice that their cat will drool excessively and that the saliva may be blood tinged.  Still other cats may paw at their mouth.   Some cats stop eating their dry food because it is too painful but may eat canned food if offered.   Owners often misinterpret this behavior and attribute it to the cat being finicky.   Sometimes the gum pain will cause cats to become reclusive, irritable, or aggressive.   Cats with LPGS often have bad breath.

Confirming the tentative diagnosis of LPGS is performed under light anesthesia after a careful oral exam has been completed.   The exam normally shows extremely red swollen gums and gum tissue that bleeds easily when touched.   The gums are the most frequent oral tissue involved. However, other areas of the mouth may also be inflamed such as the roof of the mouth, the tissue surrounding the tonsils and the lips.  Gum recession and periodontitis are often noted.  It should be realized that there are other conditions such as cancer and “eosinophilic granuloma complex” that resemble LPGS because they produce inflammation and swelling of the mouth and gums, however the treatment protocol is quite different. Consequently a surgical biopsy of the oral tissue involved should be performed and the sample sent out to a pathologist for  histopathology.   Dental x-rays should also be taken to rule out other dental diseases such as retained root tips and cavities which are known as “neck lesions” because they occur at the neck of the tooth, just at or under the gum margin.

Once the diagnosis of LPGS is confirmed the question of how to treat the disease remains.   The primary therapeutic approach is to find ways to reduce the inflammation in the cat’s mouth.  If sensitivity to dental plaque is thought to be the cause then a thorough cleaning of the cat’s teeth including the pockets under the cat’s gums should be performed at least three times yearly.  Home dental care by owners is just as important as the professional teeth cleaning and should be performed on a daily basis.   Unfortunately, many cats with this disease have mouths that are so sore that brushing is impossible so dental antibacterial rinses may be all that can be done.   The problem is that even with frequent professional cleanings and conscientious home care the disease may not be alleviated.   Ongoing oral anti-microbial therapy in conjunction with anti-inflammatory steroid therapy may help at first, but many cats become unresponsive to such therapy.   When all else fails extraction of all the cats teeth may be necessary to give relief from this chronically painful condition and allow the pet to eat and live a comfortable life.   Cats that undergo this procedure will recover quite quickly and go on to eating canned cat food without a problem after the gums have healed.    A few cats may need periodic injections of anti inflammatory medication to deal with flare ups even after full mouth dental extractions.   In such cases long acting steroids have been the only solution available to veterinarians who practice only conventional medicine.  On the other hand holistic veterinarians will attempt to manage the disease with a more natural approach that includes laser therapy, herbal anti inflammatory, natural hydrocortisone therapy, Vitamin C, Coenzyme Q 10, DMSO and even low dose cytokine therapy.  Monolauren therapy may be used in place of antibiotics.

No doubt management of this disease is very challenging for both the conventional and holistic veterinarian and clients need to realize that their cat may be facing a life time of more frequent veterinary visit and home therapy. Anything a cat owner can do to be proactive and maintain the oral health of their pet will pay huge benefits in providing their special friend with a longer carefree life.

To learn more about alternative and holistic health care for pets visit        www. doc4pets.com

 

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

 

A SIMPLE BLOOD SCREEN TO DETECT EARLY CANCER IN DOGS

Half of all dogs that live to the age of ten will eventually die of cancer.    And for those breeds that are genetically predisposed to cancer the percentage that die is even higher.   It is extremely important to catch developing cancer as early as possible if you want to have the greatest chance  for successful therapy.

For most owners discovering that their dog has cancer is a moment filled with fear and uncertainty.   Unfortunately, cancer is usually discovered in its later stages when the treatment options are more limited, less effective, and more expensive.  All too frequently the diagnosis of cancer typically ends in disaster.   If cancer can be caught early prior to the appearance of outward signs more effective treatment options become available.   Even the more aggressive cancers like hemangiosarcomas can  be treated cost effectively when caught in very early stages.   Unfortunately, routine annual or even semi-annual health exams will not catch cancer in its very early stages.    Even annual blood and urine screens are unlikely to detect cancer early.  An ultrason or MRI are not commonly used as screening test because they are expensive and do not always give a definitve diagnosis.   Biopsies are not performed until an actual mass has been identified by manual palpation, radiographs, ultrason, or MRI.   Up until a few years ago there really was no way to catch cancer early before the mass was felt or other symptoms were present   By the time symptoms are detected there is a good chance the  cancer has already spread from the original site to lymph nodes, the lungs or other distant organs.

The exciting news is that there is now a simple, painless cancer blood screen for the “apparently” healthy dog with no signs of disease.   The name of this cancer screen  is “INCaSe” and it utilizes dual “biomarkers”,  Thymidine Kinase (TK) and C-reactive Protein (CRP).  TK levels have been shown in numerous studies in animals and humans, to correlate with the development of cancer.   CRP is a protein produced in the liver in response to inflammation .   By coupling the results of the TK and CRP test values, the INCase cancer screen can detect  the presence of cancer in its very early stages before any signs of disease are apparent.    A negative INCase finding is a strong indication that the pet is cancer free.

There has been a long standing study showing the relationship between cancer and inflammation.   Research has shown that inflammation plays an important role at each stage of cancer development. That is why in addition to the TK marker for cancer, the INCase Screen also tests for CRP which is the most accurate method for detecting hidden inflammation in the body.    Therefore even if the TK marker shows negative for cancer,  if the CRP is significantly elevated it is  awarning sign that more diagnostic work needs to be done to discover the site of inflammation and eliminate it.

The combining of these two “biomarkers”, the TK and CRP, provides a “Neoplasia (cancer) index”.   By detecting   the presence of both abnormal cell division and abnormal levels of inflammation in an apparently health pet,  the ability to identify the presence of cancer is greatly amplified over using just one or the other test alone.  It is this unique  way of combining and interpreting these two tests that is now being evaluated for a patent.

INCaSe has the unique intended use as a wellness screen for the “apparently” healthy dog prior to the onset of visible signs of cancer.     For a product to make this claim, it must be clinically studied for this specific use and this is what separates INCaSe from other cancer screen tests.    In an ongoing clinical study involving the University of Missouri, 327 “apparently” healthy dogs of high cancer risk breeds and over the age of 5 years were collected for analysis and followed for 9 months. Of the 327 dogs, 10 developed cancer, and INCaSe was able to detect 100% of all these cancers  up to 109 days prior to the onset of visible signs.  The test is very accurate and has a very low chance for false positive and for false negative results.

If a dog is found INCaSe positive then a confirmatory test called  “VDI-TKcanine+” should be run.   If a dog  is suspected of having cancer based on physical exam or other findings then the VDI-TKcanine+ cancer test  should be run in place of the INCaSe test.  The VDI-TKcanine+ can also be used to monitor the progress of dogs with confirmed cancer.
While middle aged and older dogs have a much higher risk of developing cancer, dogs of any age are at risk.  All breeds are susceptible for cancer but some breeds show a particularly high incidence.  The following is a partial list of breeds more susceptible to cancer:

Golden Retrievers, Boxers, Great Danes, Greyhounds, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Rottweilers, Pointers, Cocker Spaniels, German Shepherds, English Setters, Doberman Pinschers, Portuguese Water Dogs, Standard Poodles, Scottish Terriers, Schnauzers,  West Highland White

At Woodside Animal Clinic we are recommending that all dogs over 5 years of age be given the INCase cancer blood screen at least once yearly.   Dogs over 10 years of age should be tested every 6 months.   If a dog is from one of the breeds that have a high risk for cancer then this dog should be checked twice yearly starting at the age of 5 years.

At Woodside, if cancer is detected early before the patient  is displaying overt signs of disease then we will recommend a number alternative therapies which may include anyone or all of the following:  nutritional therapy including homemade diets, orthomolecular therapy, systemic enzyme therapy, and antioxidant therapy.   Additional approachs include: gastro intestinal support, immune system support, liver detoxification,  pH and voltage support,  acupuncture and microcurrent therapy, oxygen therapy,  alkaline water and  sea salt therapy, Neoplasene therapy,  as well as intravenous vitamin C,   IV glutathione and IV phosphytidyl choline therapy to name just a few of the ways Woodside is prepared to help your pet combat cancer.

Presently there is not an INCase Screening test for apparently health cats but the company tells me there will be one in the not too distant future.

For more on alternative / holistic medicine visit us at www.doc4pets.com

 

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

PET MASSAGE THERAPY

Massage therapy is an invaluable tool for both the prevention and rehabilitation of musculo-skeletal and neurologic injuries in pets and humans.   It can be performed by a trained massage therapist, a veterinarian or the pet’s caregiver (after being taught  how to do it).   Massage therapy benefits the pet or human body in a number of ways including pain relief, reduction in swelling and edema of injured or overworked body parts, and the prevention or breakdown of fibrous muscular adhesions.  The term massage means “knead” and it is used to describe the manipulation of soft tissue of the body.   Massage is performed for the purpose of producing healthy changes in the musculoskeletal, nervous, respiratory, and circulatory system.    There is an increasing awareness of the physiologic, mechanical, and psychological effects of massage therapy.  Consequently, there has become a greater interest in the use of massage therapy in sport and rehabilitation medicine.    If you are considering learning to massage your own pet then there are several basic principles of massage that you should keep in mind as you apply this therapy:
1)   The pressure applied should never cause pain.   If your pet shows any discomfort reduce the pressure to where the pet is more comfortable and then slowly increase pressure to find the threshold of tolerance (i.e.  the point where pet enjoys the massage because it “hurts good”).
2)   If you are trying to sedate a painful body area then use a slow rate and constant rhythm of stroking.  If you are attempting to stimulate an area then use a fast and strong rhythm.
3)   When giving a massage you should always stroke in the direction of the blood flow.    When massaging the limbs work from area closest to the body and proceed toward the toes.
4)  The length of the massage should last only 15 minutes.   Frequent short massages seem to work better than infrequent long ones.

There are 4 basic massage techniques:
1)   Petri sage:   This technique involves compression or kneading.   Petri sage involves picking up the skin and muscle between the thumb and forefinger and the muscle is lifted from the bone or rolled and compressed.   The effect of this is to enhance circulation and get rid of waste products, stretch muscles and tendons and helps reduce or prevent adhesions.
2)  Effleurage:   This technique involves stroking, either light or heavy stroking of the skin.  This approach allows the therapist to look for areas of pain and muscle spasms.
3)   Friction:   Using the hand or fingers the skin in one area is made to move in small circles over the tissue.    It is used to loosen adhesions and encourage absorption of local edema.
4)   Percussion:  This technique uses rapid, percussive movement of both hands in alternating fashion.  The side of the hand, the fist, or the tips of the fingers is employed.

You may be interested in knowing why massage works.    Massage increases the circulation of blood and lymph.   If massage is performed in the direction of blood flow it moves blood toward the heart.  It is very effective in supporting circulation in deep veins, arterioles and capillaries.  Massage also encourages increased circulation in the superficial lymphatics and veins and aids in the exchange of blood nutrients and waste.     Massage can restore circulation to inactive muscles where blood has pooled because of poor venous return.   Massage should never be used in areas of infection or when blood clotting is suspected in order to avoid the spread of infection or the obstruction of blood flow by the plugging of blood vessels.

Moderate pressure massage causes stimulation of  special nerve endings in the  skin which can alter the of the autonomic nervous  through transmission of impulses down the Vagus nerve.  The Vagus nerve is one of the 12 cranial verves and sends and receives nerve fibers and impulses to almost every organ in the body.    Vagal nerve output effects the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and excretory system.  Essentially  massage applied to the skin and underlying connective tissue fascia will reduce sympathetic nervous system (fight and flight)  and  increase parasympathic tone.    Animals which suffer from many acute or chronic diseases have elevated sympathetic tone which can be reduced with medical massage.

The most common use of massage is the relief of tight achy muscles.    Muscle damage results in fibrosis which eventually ends up as adhesions between muscle fibers adjacent to one another.  These adhesions contract with time and produce restricted movement and shortened muscles.   Massage breaks down these adhesions and prevents future development of fibrosis and more adhesions.    Muscle injuries in athletic pets and people are most often in the deeper hard to reach muscles.  They are usually in areas where the muscle attaches to bone by structures called tendons. Massage before exercise can help prevent muscle injury and after exercise will reduce soreness, stiffness, and pain.

Massage helps reduce stress, prevents pressure sores, corrects gaits, and improves posture, and puts the body back in balance.  Once a muscle is injured the body often compensates by using other muscle.  This in turn,  can  lead to further muscle damage.
Massaging your healthy uninjured pet can be a very healthy  relaxing experience for both pet and caregiver.   Although we can’t ask our four legged friends how much they enjoy being massaged it is obvious by their demeanor that it is quite pleasurable experience.  It is also a very pleasant experience for the caregiver.   The act of massaging your pet is a great way to deepen the human animal bond you have already established.

For more information on alternative and holistic medicine please visit us at  www.doc4pets.com

PET SKIN ALLERGIES MAKE VETS AND PETS SCRATCH THEIR HEADS

 

Of all the different diseases veterinarians treat, “allergic inhalant dermatitis”, also known as “atopic dermatitis” or “atopy”, is no doubt the most frustrating for both owner and veterinarian alike.   Why is this you may ask?  Well in this article I will explain the many difficulties veterinarians run up against when trying to diagnose and treat a dog with “atopy”.   To begin with atopy must  first be diagnosed and distinguish from a number of other skin diseases which have as their main symptom itching and scratching.      These other conditions which must be ruled out before the diagnosis of “atopic dermatitis” can be made include mange, yeast and fungal infections, bacterial infections, food sensitivities, fleas and contact dermatitis.      To further confuse the diagnosis, pets with atopy often develop the secondary problems of yeast and bacterial infections and consequently more than one problem often exists at the same time.

To Further add  to both the veterinarian’s and owner’s frustration is the fact that atopy often causes intense itching and because the pet is so uncomfortable the pet owner is desperate to find some way to provide their pet “immediate” relief.     When these atopic dogs are scratching themselves raw it is initially necessary to break the “itch scratch cycle” with some form of cortico-steroid.    Although steroids are not the long term solution there is little else available that will give the necessary immediate relief.   Anti-histamines, fatty acid supplements,  oatmeal baths  or crème rinses, and herbal anti inflammatories may help some but rarely provide the immediate relief owners are expecting.     In spite of the fact that long term use of steroids has  unwanted side effects,  the short term use may be necessary to prevent self inflicted skin mutilation which leads to secondary bacterial infections .    Once the intense itching and scratching has subsided other supplements and medications may be used to replace steroid therapy.   Most veterinarians realize that steroid therapy is a stop gap measure that is simply treating the symptoms and not the cause of the problem, however, a short term, reducing dose course of steroids is often necessary until the other approaches have a chance to kick in.     As a holistic veterinarian I minimize many of the unwanted side effects of steroid therapy by using “natural hydrocortisone” rather than synthetic steroids like prednisone or prednisolone.

Another frustration veterinarian’s face in dealing with allergic inhalant dermatitis is the fact that many animals with atopy may, at the same time, have food sensitivities.    Allergic inhalant dermatitis usually starts out as a seasonal problem and progresses over several years to become a year round one.    Food sensitivities, on the other hand, are year round.    When animals have year round itching and scratching your veterinarian must try to discover whether the problem is atopy, food sensitivity or a combination of both.    If both airborne and food allergens are causing the dogs itching and scratching then both problems must be dealt with if the pet’s itching and scratching is to be minimized.   Because food allergies may be due to both the food and to chemicals added to the food, such as preservatives, coloring agents, flavor enhancers or texturizers, trying to discover the allergic component in the food is often quite difficult and requires the use of food trials that use limited ingredient diets.   A limited ingredient diet is defined as a diet that is made with only a single carbohydrate and a single protein source, such as duck and potato.    When attempting to reduce itching and scratching through a limited ingredient diet trial there is further frustration because the effects of the new diet can take up to 12 weeks to see if it is going to work.

Adding to the owner’s frustration is the fact that successfully treating atopic dermatitis usually requires that the pet be given several supportive drugs or nutritional supplements in addition to weekly baths that will help treat complicating yeast or bacterial infections.   It is also important to give liver and intestinal support supplements in order to reduce the number of air borne and food allergens entering the pet’s blood.   Veterinarians are well aware that giving a pet all these oral supplements along with weekly medicated bath requires a huge commitment on the part of the pet owner.    Understand that this commitment to daily therapy must go on for months.

If a pet owner makes this commitment and has conscientiously applied the therapeutic strategy for months with poor results then the next step would be to have the pet allergy tested in order to find which airborne allergens are causing the intense itching.    Once the offending airborne allergens have been identified a “hyposensitizing serum” made up of these allergens can be prepared and the owner can be taught how to give simple periodic injection just under the skin.    Unfortunately allergy testing and subsequent desensitization can be expensive and is not guaranteed to work.     To add to the frustration it can take up to 9 months of allergy serum injections to determine if the  hypo- sensitization approach will provide the answer.

By now I think it should be obvious that diagnosing and treating a dog or cat with allergic inhalant dermatitis is huge undertaking for both veterinarian and pet owner alike.   A thorough exam and careful history is just the beginning.   Periodic recheck exams at 3 to 4 week intervals will be necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment.    Changes in treatment may be necessary depending on how the pet’s skin is responding and how uncomfortable the pet is.     Following the veterinarian’s instructions to the letter is extremely important in order for him or her to judge whether therapeutic changes must be made.

Besides the above conventional approach to treating pets with skin allergies, holistic veterinarian can add acupuncture, herbal therapy, NAET, bio identical natural hormone therapy, FSM therapy, and monolaurin therapy.

For more on alternative and holistic medicine please visit  us at www.doc4pets.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HOLISTIC PAIN MANAGEMENT FOR PETS

There are many types of pain.  Some are very severe and others more tolerable.   Although we think of pain as bad it is actually the body’s way of letting us know that something is wrong.   It tells us to slow down and protect the damaged area.    Without pain we would not be aware that we were damaged in some way and we would continue doing things that would make the pain worse.    Of course, if the pain is severe using pain killers to make life more tolerable is often necessary.   However simply masking the pain without taking additional steps to help the damaged area heal would be a big mistake.

Pets can develop painful conditions for a number of reasons and what relieves their pain depends to a great extent on what causes it.    Common painful conditions that dogs and cats develop include musculo-skeletal diseases which include injured muscles, tendons, ligaments, cartilage and bone.    Specific problems such as arthritis, a torn cruciate ligament, a torn muscle, a torn menisci, hip dysplasia, a dislocated hip, osteomyelitis  and  osteosarcoma are all diseases causing musculoskeletal pain.   Other painful conditions may originate from the diseases of the nervous system including spinal cord compression from intervertebral disks disease, narrowing of the spinal canal known as vertebral stenosis. and spinal arthritis (vertebral spondylosis) which often compresses spinal nerve roots.    Gastro intestinal pain may result from gas distension, a gastric ulcer, and an intestinal foreign body causing intestinal obstruction.    Urinary tract pain can arise from stones in the kidney or passing down the ureters.   Stones lodged in the pets urethra can cause the bladder to distend and become very painful.    Oral pain can arise from loose teeth, a cavity, a tooth root abscess, or expose dental pulp.   A corneal eye ulcer, a foreign body in the eye or glaucoma can all cause severe eye pain.   To reiterate it is important to keep in mind that pain is a protective mechanism the body uses to tell the pet or person to avoid using the area while healing is occurring.  Consequently masking pain with pain killers although sometimes necessary may encourage the pet to use the limb before proper healing has occurred.

Before pain can be treated it must first be recognized by either the pet’s guardian or the veterinarian.    Because animals can’t tell us where it hurts and when it hurts caretakers and veterinarians must learn to recognize subtle signs of pain.    Sometimes pain is obvious such as when a pet walks stiffly or limps, or screams out when he or she moves in a certain way or is touched at a certain spot.   However, some dogs or cats are more stoic and pain may not be so obvious to the pet’s caretaker.    The less obvious signs of pain include a change in posture,  subtle changes in gait,  a change in ear, tail or head carriage, less activity, a decreased appetite, an increased heart rate, dilated pupils,   excessive panting, a personality change such as a more aggressive or fearful nature.

Once pain has been recognized and hopefully localized, there are many holistic options for reducing pain and making the pet more comfortable.   These options include herbal and nutritional anti-inflammatories like:     Valerian root, Rosemary, Ginger, Celery seed, Phenylalanine, DMSO, MSM, Hops, and Boswellia.  Glucosamine, collagen type 2, Hyaluranic acid, Yucca, and Ultra-InflammX .    Homotoxicology remedies like Trammel, Zeel, Spascupreel and Traumeel are all used to treat painful conditions.   The herbal or homeopathic remedy Arnica has long history of being used for pain management

Other  techniques  which can minimize pain include acupuncture, chiropractic, veterinary orthopedic manipulation (VOM), pulsed magnetic therapy,  Frequency Specific Micro current (FSM), infrasonic therapy, Class 4 Laser therapy,  massage therapy, trigger point therapy, prolo-therapy,   physical therapy,   Rubeolla viral Immune Modulator injection (RVI),  and finally Adequin and Legend injections.

The above therapies for pain can be used alone or in combination.     Keep in mind that what works well for anyone animal may not work as well for another.    Pets are like people and each individual has a unique physiology which determines which remedies or modalities work the best for them.   Consequently, it may take several trials before the best solution is found.

It is important to point out that holistic solutions are commonly not as fast acting as drugs but are much safer.     For most herbs or nutritional remedies pain relief may take as long as 2-3 weeks and consequently the quicker acting drugs may have to use in the initial stages in combination with the slower natural remedies.

Finally, one thing pet caregivers must realize is that it is very important to keep their dog under control during the healing process.    As we reduce the pets pain they want to run after birds, rabbits or squirrel in spite of their discomfort and in doing so commonly reinjure themselves.    Short easy walks can be beneficial but if the dog is pulling hard on the leash the walk may be contra-productive.

For more information on alternative and holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com.

 

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal, one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing
dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is
certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to  Awakenings magazine.

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Farmington, Farmington, Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, lymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Union Lake, Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe
Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint , Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

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DEGENERATIVE KIDNEY DISEASE AND KIDNEY FAILURE

Kidney failure is the number one killer of older cats and dogs.    If a dog or cat lives to a ripe old age the likelihood is that degenerative kidney disease will progress to kidney failure and finally take his or her life.    Kidney disease is a slow, progressive process that begins in youth and little by little destroys so many kidney cells that the organ ceases to function properly.   Unfortunately symptoms of kidney damage do not appear until late in the process when at least 70% of the functional kidney is destroyed.   Consequently, a pet owner will have no idea that a serious problem exists until the disease has reached an advanced and critical stage.   Semi annually testing your senior pets urine and blood will detect kidney disease somewhat earlier than waiting for symptoms to appear.    A relatively new urine test known as the ERD (Early Renal Disease) will detect evidence of kidney disease which might be missed by a standard urinalysis.   It is important to not that unlike the liver, when kidney cells die they are not replaced.   That is to say that the liver has regenerative capabilities not found in the kidney.    Consequently, serious damage done to the kidney is permanent.    Each year our pets loose a little more of there kidney function until the critical stage of kidney failure is reached.   Things that can destroy your pets kidneys include:  Bacterial infections, food and environmental toxins, allergic reactions, auto immune disease, trauma, high blood pressure, drugs and any inflammatory reaction in the body.    Once enough damage is done to the kidneys the organ becomes progressively less efficient at removing metabolic toxins from the cat or dogs blood and toxins build up until death occurs.   Symptoms of advanced kidney disease include weight loss, increased drinking and urinating,  and loss of house training.    If any of these symptoms are noticed it is important to make an appointment with your veterinarian and bring in a urine sample for testing.

Traditionally kidney failure is treated with a prescription kidney diet and the administration of subcutaneous (under the skin) fluid therapy to help rehydrate the pet and to flush toxins out of the body and a faster rate.   Fortunately, with alternative medicine and holistic veterinary care,  we have a number of additional options can help to prolong your dog or cats life.    Oral or injectable antioxidant therapy will help neutralize many of the free radicals which are destroying the kidney cells.   Important antioxidants include coenzyme Q10, alpha lipoic acid,  resveratrol and nega hydrate.   The use of Celtic sea salt will help reduce acidity which develops with progressive kidney damage.   Chiropractic care helps support the bodies ability to neurologically control the kidney.   There are very specific acupuncture points which address kidney issues and are very useful at helping with kidney failure.   Systemic enzyme therapy utilizes powerful proteolytic enzymes which once in the kidney reduce inflammation and dissolve scaring which inhibits kidney function.     Pulsed magnetic therapy can help to rehabilitate kidney cell that have been damaged but are functioning poorly.    Pulsed magnetic therapy works  by restoring diminished cellular voltage that is necessary for the cell to perform its many activities.   “Frequency specific microcurrent” is a holistic modality which uses very specific electrical frequencies to slow the progression of kidney damage.  A chinese herbal remedy known as Rehmania has been used in Asia for centuries in the treatment of kidney disease.   Although stem cell therapy for treating kidney disease is not yet a possibility it is exciting to know that scientist are very close to making this a reality for our dogs and cats.

Because the loss of kidney cells from disease is presently permanent any thing you can do through out your pets life to avoid such damage makes so much more sense than trying to treat an already diseased kidney.    Protecting your pet’s kidneys begins with proving your pet a clean and healthy life style.   A superior diet that has a minimal number of chemical toxins that may be present  in the form of preservatives,  artificial coloring agents,  and chemical texturizures.   Other toxins encountered may enter your pets  food accidently or intentionally such what when cows were accidently fed fire retardant chemicals or when the chinese provide food ingredients that contained melamine.   Of course, a superior food not only avoids dangerous toxins it also has a full compliment of nutritional ingredients that are essential for the proper functioning of the liver and immune system.   Such a diet will be much better prepared to fight off invading bacteria and to remove ingested toxins from the blood stream.    Providing fresh, alkalinized water which contains few or no toxins is very important for the health of the  kidneys and the body as a whole.    Unfortunately with the limited space available it is impossible to go into more detail about optimal nutrition.       For a much more in depth discussion on optimal nutrition for dogs and cats you can visit either of my website doc4pets.com or my blog myholisticpetvet.com

 

Kidney disease is a silent killer that is much better prevented than treated.   Unfortunately,  avoiding damaging substances in our environment, food and water is becoming more and more difficult given the toxic world we and our pets live in.   All we can do is our best to help our pets live a clean and healthy life.

For mor information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

 

TREATING ITCHING AND SCRATCHING: A ticklish subject

Why is my dog itching, scratching, or chewing at himself? Is one of the most common questions dog and cat owners are asking their  veterinarian.    Just as with humans  there are many reasons why dogs and cats may itch, scratch or chew at themselves.   Keep in mind that itchiness is a symptom and not a disease and that  scratching is almost always the result of itchiness.    The often daunting challenge  the veterinarian is faced with is identifying the cause of the itching and the prevention of the scratching.  There are many causes for itching and scratching.    Included are parasites such as fleas, ticks, and mites.   A bacterial dermatitis known as a “pyoderma” produces pimples that are very irritating .   Allergies result in skin rashes which cause severe itching and scratching and can lead to a  secondary  bacterial or yeast infection.   Autoimmune reactions can cause the skin to become red, raw, and itchy especially at the sites on the body where the skin
turns in ward and becomes the mucous membrane.    Nutritional deficiencies of such things as fatty acids, fat soluble vitamins and zinc can cause dry unhealthy skin which results in a dull, lack luster hair coat and itchy skin.

Some of the above causes of rashes,  itching and scratching are easily diagnosed while  others require a good bit of detective work.   Laboratory test used to diagnose itchy  skin problems include impression smears for yeast and bacteria infections, skin scrapings for mange mite infestations, cultures for bacterial or fungal infections, biopsies for helping identify cancer, hormonal diseases, allergies and auto immune processes.   Special ultra violet lights can discover certain types of fungal diseases.   Other laboratory test involve sending blood to an outside laboratory for measuring hormone levels .    Urine tests are available for detecting elevated cortisol levels that could cause a dog to itch and scratch.

Of course many diseases which cause itching, scratching and rashes can be treated symptomatically without actually knowing the cause of the problem .    However masking symptoms without  also treating the cause will  only be a temporary solution and the problem
will return as soon as the medication is stopped.    There are times  when the itching and scratching is so severe that drugs like corticosteroids must be used, short term,  to break the itch scratch cycle and give the pet relief .   In such cases giving the minimal amount of  a steroid  drug on an every other day dosage schedule helps to minimize the possibility of serious side effects.     Combining steroids with  anti inflammatory remedies like antihistamines and fatty acid supplements will allow for using lower doses of steroids.    The use of “natural hydrocortisone” which comes from the Yam  plant is an excellent alternative to synthetic cortisone such as prednisone or rednisolone.   Natural hydrocortisone is  “bio-identical” and thus produces fewer side effect than its synthetic drug counterparts.    If the itching and scratching is not too  severe then cortisone therapy may be avoided by using a number of other less aggressive approaches.    Frequent bathing with  a gentle herbal shampoo can help to calm the skin and wash off offending allergens.   Crème rinses that contain colloidal oatmeal, moisturizures, and a local skin analgesic like “pramoxine” can be used after a shampoo or all by themselves.     Clipping your pet’s coat short will make bathing and medicating much easier.  Sprays containing aloe and calendula can be applied  to localized rashes.    Licorice root is an herb given by mouth that  stimulates the pets  adrenal gland to produce more cortisone and thus reduce itching and scratching.   Doubling the recommended dose of oral omega fatty acids is recommended during seasonal outbreaks  when itching
is most intense.    Using an antihistamine such as benidryl  may be helpful both for its anti allergic effects and its mild sedative properties.

Regardless of the cause of itching and scratching,  the most important first step is to stop self mutilation  In the initial stages of treating severe chewing and scratching  an elizabethan  restraint collar can be placed around  the animals neck to stop licking but does little to prevent scratching unless the pet is scratching at his or her ears.    You may also want to consider clipping you pets nails short and/ortaping  padded socks over  the  dog or cat’s back feet.    You may be reluctant to use an Elizabethan collar or to pad the feet  but if you do not the self trauma becomes  a vicious cycle that even cortisone therapy won’t stop.

In summary ,  the causes of itching and scratching are numerous and  successful treatment of the problems depends on an accurate diagnosis.    Even after the problem is diagnosed successful therapy may be challenging  and frustrating  especially if the  pet’s caretaker does not thoroughly comply with their veterinarians recommendations .

For more information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets.com.

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio

 

 

 

 

What Is The Difference Between Holistic and Homeopathic Medicine?

Are you confused by the difference between the terms holistic medicine, homeopathic medicine , alternative medicine, complementary medicine, integrative medicine, natural medicine, vibrational medicine, energy medicine, herbal medicine,  and botanical medicine.   Well don’t feel alone, many  are .   Therefore let me attempt to help clear things up.

Holistic medicine is an umbrella term that includes such therapies as:  clinical nutrition, acupuncture, chiropractic, homeopathy, homotoxicology, functional medicine, herbal or botanical medicine, prolo therapy,  vibrational or energy medicine, detoxification and more.  Holistic medicine views the body as a whole and not as a bunch of isolated organs or organ systems.   The holistic point of view is that no one system functions on its own .   A disease which may on the surface appear to affect only one  organ system actually affects all systems.     Holistic medicine does not attempt to name  or treat individual diseases but does attempt to identify and correct  abnormal body  functions which may underlie many diseases.     Holistic medicine believes that the major underlying causes of  dysfunction include:  malnutrition,  a leaky gut, an unbalanced immune system, an out of control inflammatory response,  poor detoxification,  a deficiency of antioxidants,  a loss of cellular communication, excessive physical and psychologic stress,   spinal misalignment,  neurotransmitter  imbalance and poor hormonal control.

Vibrational medicine, also known as energy medicine or bio resonance therapy,  is another broad category under holistic medicine.   Vibrational medicine includes soft laser therapy, homeopathy, pulsed magnetic therapy, infrasonic therapy, electro-crystal therapy, frequency specific micro current, color therapy and aroma therapy.    All of these different vibrational modalities utilize different forms of energetic vibrations to either reestablish health using resonance frequencies  or destroy  harmful bacteria or viruses using destructive frequencies.    Vibrational medicine also includes the area of hands on healing      Keep in mind that our most brilliant quantum physicist tell us that our world is not that of particles but of waves and frequencies. There is truly nothing solid about are reality.    We and our pets are in a very real sense  energy beings and given that context disease is really a body that is out of tune. Healing then is simply the retuning of the body to a state of vibrational harmony.

Alternative medicine, complimentary medicine, and integrative medicine are all terms that have all been used in place of holistic medicine.   Of these terms integrative medicine comes the closest to the description I use for holistic medicine because it implies the use of both holistic and traditional medicine together.   In its truest form holistic medicine does not exclude traditional medicine but embraces its judicious use when the situation call for it.

“Homeopathy”  is the term that is most often confused with the term  and used in place of  the term “holistic”.   New pet owners who are looking for a holistic veterinary care all too often request the homeopathic approach.   Understand that homeopathy is a specific type of holistic medicine which uses very dilute homeopathic remedies to heal patient.   On the other hand holistic medicine includes not only homeopathy but also many other holistic approaches like acupuncture and chiropractic.

For more information on alternative or holistic medicine please visit us at www.doc4pets .

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Woodside Animal Clinic is a unique, very personal,  one doctor practice where, for over 35 years, Dr. Simon has been healing dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles with both conventional and alternative medicine.  Dr. Simon is certified in Acupuncture, Chiropractic and Stem cell therapy.  He is the author  of 4 pet care books, a past president of the Oakland County Veterinary Medical Association and a regular contributor to Natural Awakenings magazine.   Visit us at Doc4pets.com

Woodside Animal Clinic sees pets from all over Michigan but primarily from the greater Detroit  area  including Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Livingston counties.   Cities in these counties including Royal Oak, Berkley, Huntington Woods, Ferndale, Pleasant Ridge, Detroit, Redford, Livonia, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Warren, Centerline, Clawson,  Troy, Sterling Heights, Southfield, Birmingham, Lathrup Village, Bingham Farms, Franklin, Beverly Hills, Farmington, Farmington Hills, Novi, Wixom, Brighton, Livonia, Plymouth, Commerce, Ann Arbor, Ortonville, Waterford, Clarkston, Union Lake,  Rochester,  Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Utica,  Grosse Pointe Farms, Grosse Pointe,  Romeo,  Flint, Hartland,  Lansing, Okemos, Flint, Howell,  Brighton, White Lake, Romeo, Saline, South Lyon, Windsor Canada, Toledo Ohio